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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Television Dramas, Disability, and Religious Knowledge: Considering Call the Midwife and Grey’s Anatomy as Religiously Significant Texts

Religion Department, Midland University, Fremont, NE 68025, USA
Religions 2017, 8(10), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8100209
Received: 15 August 2017 / Revised: 21 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion, Disability, and Social Justice: Building Coalitions)
Images and narratives of people with disabilities in popular culture shape the perceptions of people with and without disabilities. When these narratives raise philosophical and religious questions emerging from the lives of people with disabilities, and depict meaningful engagements between people with disabilities and religious practices, an underexamined body of knowledge emerges. The television series Call the Midwife and Grey’s Anatomy both have episodes that depict families responding to a disability diagnosis in a newborn infant, and each offers a potentially significant account of what it means to be a person born with a disability. While popular culture depictions of disability often reinscribe stigmatizing stereotypes, they can also disrupt those stereotypes and identify people with disabilities as authoritative, underrecognized sources of knowledge and experience, including religious understanding. View Full-Text
Keywords: disability; popular culture; television; epistemology; Grey’s Anatomy; Call the Midwife disability; popular culture; television; epistemology; Grey’s Anatomy; Call the Midwife
MDPI and ACS Style

Wilder, C. Television Dramas, Disability, and Religious Knowledge: Considering Call the Midwife and Grey’s Anatomy as Religiously Significant Texts. Religions 2017, 8, 209.

AMA Style

Wilder C. Television Dramas, Disability, and Religious Knowledge: Considering Call the Midwife and Grey’s Anatomy as Religiously Significant Texts. Religions. 2017; 8(10):209.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wilder, Courtney. 2017. "Television Dramas, Disability, and Religious Knowledge: Considering Call the Midwife and Grey’s Anatomy as Religiously Significant Texts" Religions 8, no. 10: 209.

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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