Next Article in Journal
Buddhist Approaches to Impermanence: Phenomenal and Naumenal
Next Article in Special Issue
Meaningful Conversations: Reciprocity in Power Dynamics between Humanist Chaplains and Patients in Dutch Hospitals
Previous Article in Journal
Introduction to the Special Issue: Theodicy and Challenges of Science: Understanding God, Evil and Evolution
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Development of Non-Religious Pastoral Support in the UK
 
 
Article

An Empirical Study on the Nature of the Verbal Responses of Humanist Chaplains

by 1,2,* and 2,3
1
Independent Researcher, 6964 BK Hall, The Netherlands
2
Department of Humanist Chaplaincy Studies for a Plural Society, University of Humanistic Studies, 3512 HD Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
Department of Emergency Psychiatry and Department of Residency Training, Altrecht Mental Health Care, 3512 PG Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Gaby Jacobs and Hans Zollner
Religions 2021, 12(12), 1080; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12121080
Received: 28 September 2021 / Revised: 1 December 2021 / Accepted: 3 December 2021 / Published: 7 December 2021
There has been a limited amount of empirical research conducted in the past on how chaplains, and humanist chaplains in particular, actually interact with their clients during conversations as a part of spiritual care and counselling. The aim of the current study was to gain insight into the extent to which the verbal responses of humanist chaplains corresponded to Rogers’ nondirective approach during conversations with clients. Rogers’ approach has been commonly embraced since the beginning of the professionalization of humanist chaplains in the Netherlands. The study focused on humanist chaplains working at a general hospital in the Netherlands. Ten humanist chaplains took part in the study by audio recording their conversations with clients. The audio recordings were transcribed and analysed, and the verbal responses of humanist chaplains were compared to Rogers’ approach. Subsequently, the verbal responses were analysed via conversation analysis, which also provided insight into how the humanist chaplains actually conversed with clients. Most of the verbal responses (73%) were consistent with Rogers’ nondirective approach, though the ways in which some of the verbal responses were expressed were different; they were more compassionate and comforting. The remaining 27% of the verbal responses were directive and did not correspond to Rogers’ approach. The study shows that, compared to Rogers’ nondirective approach, the approach of the humanist chaplains was more direct and comforting. View Full-Text
Keywords: verbal response; conversation analysis; nondirective approach; humanist chaplaincy verbal response; conversation analysis; nondirective approach; humanist chaplaincy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vos, J.d.; Braam, A.W. An Empirical Study on the Nature of the Verbal Responses of Humanist Chaplains. Religions 2021, 12, 1080. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12121080

AMA Style

Vos Jd, Braam AW. An Empirical Study on the Nature of the Verbal Responses of Humanist Chaplains. Religions. 2021; 12(12):1080. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12121080

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vos, Jeroen de, and Arjan W. Braam. 2021. "An Empirical Study on the Nature of the Verbal Responses of Humanist Chaplains" Religions 12, no. 12: 1080. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12121080

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop