Next Article in Journal
Shades of Grace: The Virgin of the Rocks and Leonardo da Vinci’s Notes on Paragone
Next Article in Special Issue
The Trinity: Prototype of Real Existence or Danger to Political Wellbeing? Tanner, Volf, and Yannaras in Conversation
Previous Article in Journal
Albert the Great, the Albert Legend, and the Legitimation of the Dominicans
Previous Article in Special Issue
Deconstructing Buddhist Extremism: Lessons from Sri Lanka
Article

The Policy of the Russian Orthodox Church on International Labor Migrants: How the Public Role Collides with Preaching the Word

1
Institute of Sociology, Federal Center of Theoretical and Applied Sociology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 117218 Moscow, Russia
2
Department of Political Science, Financial University under the Government of the Russian Federation, 117133 Moscow, Russia
3
Perm Federal Research Center, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 614066 Perm, Russia
4
Department of Digital Economy and Mass Communications, Moscow Technical University of Communications and Informatics, 111024 Moscow, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Victor Roudometof and John Jillions
Religions 2021, 12(11), 993; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110993
Received: 8 October 2021 / Revised: 3 November 2021 / Accepted: 6 November 2021 / Published: 12 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Politicization of Religion from a Global Perspective)
The authors’ objective was to find out how and why the approach of the Russian Orthodox Church to sociocultural adaptation of predominantly Muslim international labor migrants has evolved from its initial stage to now. Research methodology is based on a critical analysis of various sources, on observations, and archival materials. The adaptation program of the Church was advertised as a secular project pursuing the goal of peacekeeping because of a tacit agreement on mutual non-proselytisation between the basic faith-based communities in Russia. The initiative, launched in December 2012, had to merge adaptation courses of all dioceses into a nationwide network that then was expected to become part of an all-Russian system of preparation for language and culture tests. The Church also planned to open its own network of testing centrescenters for migrants. The authors emphasize that, although some of the diocesan courses were successful, the initiative deteriorated due to many external and internal factors. One of them was that diocesan courses have proven to be unattractive for labor migrants; their curriculum was too thick and overloaded with information about Russian culture and Orthodox Christianity, while Muslim labor migrants preferred to adapt to their new environment with a mediation of their own networks. It is suggested by the authors that the main cause of the project’s non-fulfillment was an intra-church cleavage between the enthusiasts of adaptation who convinced that diocesan courses must aim at spreading the Orthodox faith to foreign workers, including Muslims, and the church officials who promoted secular curriculum and forbade preaching Christianity to labor migrants. View Full-Text
Keywords: adaptation of labor migrants; policy of adaptation; Russian Orthodox Church; faith-based organizations; Muslim migrants; adaptation network; migrant networks; Vsevolod Chaplin adaptation of labor migrants; policy of adaptation; Russian Orthodox Church; faith-based organizations; Muslim migrants; adaptation network; migrant networks; Vsevolod Chaplin
MDPI and ACS Style

Mitrofanova, A.; Riazanova, S.; Brega, A. The Policy of the Russian Orthodox Church on International Labor Migrants: How the Public Role Collides with Preaching the Word. Religions 2021, 12, 993. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110993

AMA Style

Mitrofanova A, Riazanova S, Brega A. The Policy of the Russian Orthodox Church on International Labor Migrants: How the Public Role Collides with Preaching the Word. Religions. 2021; 12(11):993. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110993

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mitrofanova, Anastasia, Svetlana Riazanova, and Aleksandr Brega. 2021. "The Policy of the Russian Orthodox Church on International Labor Migrants: How the Public Role Collides with Preaching the Word" Religions 12, no. 11: 993. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110993

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop