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Disconnection and the Healing Practice of Imagination for Mormon Environmental Ethics

School of Theology, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Academic Editor: Denise Starkey
Religions 2021, 12(11), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110948
Received: 9 August 2021 / Revised: 18 September 2021 / Accepted: 20 September 2021 / Published: 1 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latter-day Saint Theology and the Environment)
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints possesses a subversive and fecund interpretation of the Christian creation narrative. This interpretation, denying creation ex nihilo, bespeaks a particular attention to and care for the living earth. However, Latter-day Saint praxis is wounded by a searing disconnect between the theopoetics of its conceptual creation and its lived practice. I argue that the Church must understand this disconnect as a wound and attend to it as such. I turn to theopoetics, arguing that it is in the lived practices of Latter-day Saints engaging somatically with the Earth that can restore our imaginative potential and move toward healing. I begin by exploring the Christian conception of creation ex nihilo and juxtapose this with the Latter-day Saint understanding of formareex materia. I then explore the implications of such a cosmology for environmental ethics and probe the disconnections between theory and practice in Mormonism broadly construed. I propose that the healing salve for disconnection is imagination, a salve found in the first heartbeat of the Latter-day Saint story. I speak with Latter-day Saint theopoetics and indigenous voices, proposing ultimately that is with them that the healing of theology and praxis must begin. View Full-Text
Keywords: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; theopoetics; environmental ethics; creation; ex-nihilo; theological healing Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; theopoetics; environmental ethics; creation; ex-nihilo; theological healing
MDPI and ACS Style

Blair, K. Disconnection and the Healing Practice of Imagination for Mormon Environmental Ethics. Religions 2021, 12, 948. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110948

AMA Style

Blair K. Disconnection and the Healing Practice of Imagination for Mormon Environmental Ethics. Religions. 2021; 12(11):948. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110948

Chicago/Turabian Style

Blair, Kristen. 2021. "Disconnection and the Healing Practice of Imagination for Mormon Environmental Ethics" Religions 12, no. 11: 948. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12110948

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