Next Article in Journal
The Role of Religion in Creating and Maintaining Ethnic Identity—The Example of the Kashubs in Poland
Next Article in Special Issue
A Pragmatics of Ritual: The Yoshida Goma at the Interface of Shintō and Shingon
Previous Article in Journal
Emmanuel Levinas and Ethical Materialism
Previous Article in Special Issue
Daoist Cosmogony in the Kojiki 古事記 Preface
Article

Japanese Monks and Chinese Books: Glimpses of Buddhist Sinology in Early Tokugawa Japan

Department of Religions and Philosophies (emeritus), School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, London WC1H 0XG, UK
Academic Editor: Jeffrey L. Richey
Religions 2021, 12(10), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100871
Received: 10 August 2021 / Revised: 5 September 2021 / Accepted: 9 September 2021 / Published: 13 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chinese Influences on Japanese Religious Traditions)
In the17th and 18th centuries, just as English scholars were reading and writing about their heritage in the continental prestige language of Latin, so too were Japanese members of the Buddhist clergy researching and publishing about the Chinese language heritage of their own religious tradition, drawing both on new printed books, often imported from China, and on much earlier manuscripts and printed texts preserved in their own country. The importation and reprinting of the canon by Ōbaku monks and the subsequent flowering of Zen scholarship is already well-known, but we should consider the efforts of Shingon monks in commenting on the heritage they received from China eight centuries earlier, and even the activities of Nichiren monks, who took steps to promote the legacy of Chinese Tiantai Buddhism. Critical reflection on the Buddhist tradition may not have emerged in Japan until the 18th century, but it did so in the context of a world of scholarship concerning an imported classical language that certainly stood comparison with that of the contemporary Anglophone world. View Full-Text
Keywords: TokugenYōson德嚴養存 (1632–1703); Unshō運敞 (1614–1693); SōsanGensei艸山元政 (1623–1668); Nyokai如海 (?-1711); 17th-century Anglo–Japanese comparisons TokugenYōson德嚴養存 (1632–1703); Unshō運敞 (1614–1693); SōsanGensei艸山元政 (1623–1668); Nyokai如海 (?-1711); 17th-century Anglo–Japanese comparisons
MDPI and ACS Style

Barrett, T.H. Japanese Monks and Chinese Books: Glimpses of Buddhist Sinology in Early Tokugawa Japan. Religions 2021, 12, 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100871

AMA Style

Barrett TH. Japanese Monks and Chinese Books: Glimpses of Buddhist Sinology in Early Tokugawa Japan. Religions. 2021; 12(10):871. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100871

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barrett, Timothy H. 2021. "Japanese Monks and Chinese Books: Glimpses of Buddhist Sinology in Early Tokugawa Japan" Religions 12, no. 10: 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12100871

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop