Next Article in Journal
The Aesthetic Face of the Sacred
Previous Article in Journal
Human Rights Issues Arising from the Implementation of Sharia Law on the Minority of Western Thrace—ECtHR Molla Sali v. Greece, Application No. 20452/14, 19 December 2018
Previous Article in Special Issue
A View of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in a Sample of Spanish Nurses
Article Menu
Issue 5 (May) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

A Single Case Narrative of Spirituality Following Aphasia from Traumatic Brain Injury: Findings about Forgiveness and Freedom Using WELLHEAD and SHALOM

1
New Pathways, Westown Barton, Westown, Hemyock, Cullompton, Devon EX15 3RW, UK
2
Diocese of Exeter, Exeter EX1 1HS, UK
Religions 2019, 10(5), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10050301
Received: 7 January 2019 / Revised: 15 April 2019 / Accepted: 25 April 2019 / Published: 1 May 2019
  |  
PDF [381 KB, uploaded 22 May 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Rehabilitation has neglected the spirituality of people with aphasia, a neurogenic impairment of language for communication and thought processes. Aphasia reduces scope for adjustment processes where words are normal currency, such as forgiveness and reconciliation. A single case narrative was generated from a case series exploring the feasibility of spiritual health assessment in aphasia. The individual had traumatic brain injury, with the primary symptom of aphasia, giving the first detailed account of its kind. The WELLHEAD spirituality toolkit provided a structured interview approach, exploring spirituality in terms of ‘meaning and purpose’ within four dimensions, WIDE, LONG, HIGH and DEEP, incorporating patient-reported outcome measures and goal-setting, with feedback interviews. Spiritual Health and Life Orientation Measure (SHALOM) generated a comparator spiritual health assessment. The quantitative feedback measures and self-reported outcomes were complemented by detailed qualitative interview transcripts subject to systematic thematic analysis in NVivo. The findings were co-constructed and systematically verified. This non-religious narrative evidenced the accessibility, acceptability, and impact of the resources. Self-forgiveness was paramount for freedom to journey into the unknown beyond self with ‘Calm’, towards helping others and accepting help. Religion, Faith and Belief were reconceptualised. Forgiveness of self and others was integral and instrumental in recovery, offering avenues for further investigation and application. View Full-Text
Keywords: spirituality; aphasia; traumatic brain injury; forgiveness; freedom; health; communication; outcomes; assessment; intervention spirituality; aphasia; traumatic brain injury; forgiveness; freedom; health; communication; outcomes; assessment; intervention
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Mumby, K. A Single Case Narrative of Spirituality Following Aphasia from Traumatic Brain Injury: Findings about Forgiveness and Freedom Using WELLHEAD and SHALOM. Religions 2019, 10, 301.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Religions EISSN 2077-1444 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert Logo copyright Steve Bridenbaugh/UUA
Back to Top