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Article

To Get Vaccinated, or Not to Get Vaccinated, That Is the Question: Illness Representations about COVID-19 and Perceptions about COVID-19 Vaccination as Predictors of COVID-19 Vaccination Willingness among Young Adults in The Netherlands

1
Department of Socio-Medical Sciences, Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Hagen, 58097 Hagen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Efrat Neter and Karen Morgan
Vaccines 2021, 9(9), 941; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9090941
Received: 1 July 2021 / Revised: 19 August 2021 / Accepted: 20 August 2021 / Published: 24 August 2021
Mass vaccination is considered necessary to reduce the spread of COVID-19; however, vaccination willingness was found to be especially low among young adults. Therefore, based on the extended Common Sense Model, the unique effects and the interplay of illness representations about COVID-19 and perceptions about COVID-19 vaccination in explaining COVID-19 vaccination willingness was investigated using a cross-sectional design. An online survey measuring the relevant variables was filled in by 584 participants (69.9% female) between 18 and 34 years. Correlation analyses showed that all illness representation dimensions except from timeline and both dimensions of vaccination perceptions were related to vaccination willingness. The mediation analysis revealed that less personal control, more prevention control, more concerns about COVID-19 as well as more perceived necessity of and fewer concerns about the vaccination were directly related to higher vaccination willingness. Additionally, prevention control was indirectly related to higher vaccination willingness through stronger perceptions of necessity of the vaccination. The extended Common Sense Model proved to be useful in the context of illness prevention. Campaigns to improve vaccination rates should aim at increasing the perception that COVID-19 is preventable through vaccination and the personal need of the vaccination as well as at decreasing concerns about the vaccination. View Full-Text
Keywords: Common Sense Model (CSM) of self-regulation; illness representations; Necessity-Concerns Framework (NCF); treatment perceptions; vaccination willingness Common Sense Model (CSM) of self-regulation; illness representations; Necessity-Concerns Framework (NCF); treatment perceptions; vaccination willingness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vollmann, M.; Salewski, C. To Get Vaccinated, or Not to Get Vaccinated, That Is the Question: Illness Representations about COVID-19 and Perceptions about COVID-19 Vaccination as Predictors of COVID-19 Vaccination Willingness among Young Adults in The Netherlands. Vaccines 2021, 9, 941. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9090941

AMA Style

Vollmann M, Salewski C. To Get Vaccinated, or Not to Get Vaccinated, That Is the Question: Illness Representations about COVID-19 and Perceptions about COVID-19 Vaccination as Predictors of COVID-19 Vaccination Willingness among Young Adults in The Netherlands. Vaccines. 2021; 9(9):941. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9090941

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vollmann, Manja, and Christel Salewski. 2021. "To Get Vaccinated, or Not to Get Vaccinated, That Is the Question: Illness Representations about COVID-19 and Perceptions about COVID-19 Vaccination as Predictors of COVID-19 Vaccination Willingness among Young Adults in The Netherlands" Vaccines 9, no. 9: 941. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9090941

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