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Open AccessArticle

A Consent Support Resource with Benefits and Harms of Vaccination Does Not Increase Hesitancy in Parents—An Acceptability Study

1
Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
2
ASK NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
3
Faculty of Medicine and Health, Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
4
Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
5
Department of General Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, The Royal Children’s Hospital, Victoria 3052 Australia
6
Vaccine Uptake Group, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute Victoria, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vaccines 2020, 8(3), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8030500
Received: 16 July 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 25 August 2020 / Published: 2 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strategies Addressing Falling Vaccine Coverage and Vaccine Hesitancy)
It is unclear whether information given about the benefits and risks of routine childhood vaccination during consent may cue parental vaccine hesitancy. Parents were surveyed before and after reading vaccine consent information at a public expo event in Sydney, Australia. We measured vaccine hesitancy with Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccine Short Scale (PACV-SS), informed decision-making with Informed Subscale of the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS-IS), items from Stage of Decision Making, Positive Attitude Assessment, Vaccine Safety and Side Effect Concern, and Vaccine Communication Framework (VCF) tools. Overall, 416 parents showed no change in vaccine hesitancy (mean PACV-SS score pre = 1.97, post = 1.94; diff = −0.02 95% CI −0.10 to 0.15) but were more informed (mean DCS-IS score pre = 29.05, post = 7.41; diff = −21.63 95% CI −24.17 to −18.56), were more positive towards vaccination (pre = 43.8% post = 50.4%; diff = 6.5% 95% CI 3.0% to 10.0%), less concerned about vaccine safety (pre = 28.5%, post = 23.0%, diff = −5.6% 95% CI −2.3% to −8.8%) and side effects (pre = 37.0%, post = 29.0%, diff = −8.0% 95% CI −4.0% to −12.0%) with no change in stage of decision-making or intention to vaccinate. Providing information about the benefits and risks of routine childhood vaccination increases parents’ informed decision-making without increasing vaccine hesitancy. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood vaccination; consent; vaccine hesitancy; information; informed choice; consent support resource childhood vaccination; consent; vaccine hesitancy; information; informed choice; consent support resource
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MDPI and ACS Style

McDonald, C.; Leask, J.; Chad, N.; Danchin, M.; Fethney, J.; Trevena, L. A Consent Support Resource with Benefits and Harms of Vaccination Does Not Increase Hesitancy in Parents—An Acceptability Study. Vaccines 2020, 8, 500. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8030500

AMA Style

McDonald C, Leask J, Chad N, Danchin M, Fethney J, Trevena L. A Consent Support Resource with Benefits and Harms of Vaccination Does Not Increase Hesitancy in Parents—An Acceptability Study. Vaccines. 2020; 8(3):500. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8030500

Chicago/Turabian Style

McDonald, Ciara; Leask, Julie; Chad, Nina; Danchin, Margie; Fethney, Judith; Trevena, Lyndal. 2020. "A Consent Support Resource with Benefits and Harms of Vaccination Does Not Increase Hesitancy in Parents—An Acceptability Study" Vaccines 8, no. 3: 500. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8030500

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