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Human Cytomegalovirus Congenital (cCMV) Infection Following Primary and Nonprimary Maternal Infection: Perspectives of Prevention through Vaccine Development

Laboratories of Genetics, Transplantology and Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Vaccines 2020, 8(2), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020194
Received: 24 March 2020 / Revised: 13 April 2020 / Accepted: 18 April 2020 / Published: 23 April 2020
Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) might occur as a result of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) primary (PI) or nonprimary infection (NPI) in pregnant women. Immune correlates of protection against cCMV have been partly identified only for PI. Following either PI or NPI, HCMV strains undergo latency. From a diagnostic standpoint, while the serological criteria for the diagnosis of PI are well-established, those for the diagnosis of NPI are still incomplete. Thus far, a recombinant gB subunit vaccine has provided the best results in terms of partial protection. This partial efficacy was hypothetically attributed to the post-fusion instead of the pre-fusion conformation of the gB present in the vaccine. Future efforts should be addressed to verify whether a new recombinant gB pre-fusion vaccine would provide better results in terms of prevention of both PI and NPI. It is still a matter of debate whether human hyperimmune globulin are able to protect from HCMV vertical transmission. In conclusion, the development of an HCMV vaccine that would prevent a significant portion of PI would be a major step forward in the development of a vaccine for both PI and NPI. View Full-Text
Keywords: congenital cytomegalovirus; primary infection; non-primary infection; gB; neutralizing antibodies; pentameric complex; bacterial artificial chromosome; dense bodies; cytotrophoblast; hyperimmune globulin congenital cytomegalovirus; primary infection; non-primary infection; gB; neutralizing antibodies; pentameric complex; bacterial artificial chromosome; dense bodies; cytotrophoblast; hyperimmune globulin
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gerna, G.; Lilleri, D. Human Cytomegalovirus Congenital (cCMV) Infection Following Primary and Nonprimary Maternal Infection: Perspectives of Prevention through Vaccine Development. Vaccines 2020, 8, 194. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020194

AMA Style

Gerna G, Lilleri D. Human Cytomegalovirus Congenital (cCMV) Infection Following Primary and Nonprimary Maternal Infection: Perspectives of Prevention through Vaccine Development. Vaccines. 2020; 8(2):194. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020194

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gerna, Giuseppe; Lilleri, Daniele. 2020. "Human Cytomegalovirus Congenital (cCMV) Infection Following Primary and Nonprimary Maternal Infection: Perspectives of Prevention through Vaccine Development" Vaccines 8, no. 2: 194. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines8020194

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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