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Article

Pupillary Responses to Faces Are Modulated by Familiarity and Rewarding Context

1
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Luisenstr. 56, 10117 Berlin, Germany
2
Institute of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Rudower Chaussee, 12489 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Charles F. Geier
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(6), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060794
Received: 19 May 2021 / Revised: 10 June 2021 / Accepted: 14 June 2021 / Published: 16 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience)
Observing familiar (known, recognisable) and socially relevant (personally important) faces elicits activation in the brain’s reward circuit. Although smiling faces are often used as social rewards in research, it is firstly unclear whether familiarity and social relevance modulate the processing of faces differently, and secondly whether this processing depends on the feedback context, i.e., if it is different when smiles are delivered depending on performance or in the absence of any action (passive viewing). In this preregistered study, we compared pupillary responses to smiling faces differing in subjective familiarity and social relevance. They were displayed in a passive viewing task and in an active task (a speeded visual short-term memory task). The pupils were affected only in the active task and only by subjective familiarity. Contrary to expectations, smaller dilations were observed in response to more familiar faces. Behavioural ratings supported the superior rewarding context of the active task, with higher reward ratings for the game than the passive task. This study offers two major insights. Firstly, familiarity plays a role in the processing of social rewards, as known and unknown faces influence the autonomic responses differently. Secondly, the feedback context is crucial in reward research as positive stimuli are rewarding when they are dependent on performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: social reward; familiarity; social relevance; pupil size; feedback social reward; familiarity; social relevance; pupil size; feedback
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MDPI and ACS Style

Matyjek, M.; Bayer, M.; Dziobek, I. Pupillary Responses to Faces Are Modulated by Familiarity and Rewarding Context. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 794. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060794

AMA Style

Matyjek M, Bayer M, Dziobek I. Pupillary Responses to Faces Are Modulated by Familiarity and Rewarding Context. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(6):794. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060794

Chicago/Turabian Style

Matyjek, Magdalena, Mareike Bayer, and Isabel Dziobek. 2021. "Pupillary Responses to Faces Are Modulated by Familiarity and Rewarding Context" Brain Sciences 11, no. 6: 794. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060794

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