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Brief Report

¡Hola! Nice to Meet You: Language Mixing and Biographical Information Processing

1
Humanitate eta Hezkuntza Zientzien Fakultatea, Mondragon Unibertsitatea, 20500 Mondragon, Spain
2
Centro de Investigación Nebrija en Cognición, Universidad Antonio de Nebrija, 28015 Madrid, Spain
3
Department of Languages and Culture, The Arctic University of Norway, 9019 Tromsø, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul E. Engelhardt
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(6), 703; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060703
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 21 May 2021 / Accepted: 24 May 2021 / Published: 26 May 2021
In bilingual communities, social interactions take place in both single- and mixed-language contexts. Some of the information shared in multilingual conversations, such as interlocutors’ personal information, is often required in consequent social encounters. In this study, we explored whether the autobiographical information provided in a single-language context is better remembered than in an equivalent mixed-language situation. More than 400 Basque-Spanish bilingual (pre) teenagers were presented with new persons who introduced themselves by either using only Spanish or only Basque, or by inter-sententially mixing both languages. Different memory measures were collected immediately after the initial exposure to the new pieces of information (immediate recall and recognition) and on the day after (delayed recall and recognition). In none of the time points was the information provided in a mixed-language fashion worse remembered than that provided in a strict one-language context. Interestingly, the variability across participants in their sociodemographic and linguistic variables had a negligible impact on the effects. These results are discussed considering their social and educational implications for bilingual communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: language mixing; code-switching; multilingual learning; bilingual schooling language mixing; code-switching; multilingual learning; bilingual schooling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Antón, E.; Duñabeitia, J.A. ¡Hola! Nice to Meet You: Language Mixing and Biographical Information Processing. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 703. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060703

AMA Style

Antón E, Duñabeitia JA. ¡Hola! Nice to Meet You: Language Mixing and Biographical Information Processing. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(6):703. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060703

Chicago/Turabian Style

Antón, Eneko, and Jon A. Duñabeitia 2021. "¡Hola! Nice to Meet You: Language Mixing and Biographical Information Processing" Brain Sciences 11, no. 6: 703. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060703

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