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Article

Nonverbal Semantics Test (NVST)—A Novel Diagnostic Tool to Assess Semantic Processing Deficits: Application to Persons with Aphasia after Cerebrovascular Accident

1
Clinical Neuropsychology Research Group, Institute of Phonetics and Speech Processing, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80799 Munich, Germany
2
Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany
3
Sprach- und Schlucktherapie, Schön Klinik München Schwabing, 80804 Munich, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paola Marangolo and Nadine Martin
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(3), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030359
Received: 10 January 2021 / Revised: 26 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 March 2021 / Published: 11 March 2021
Assessment of semantic processing capacities often relies on verbal tasks which are, however, sensitive to impairments at several language processing levels. Especially for persons with aphasia there is a strong need for a tool that measures semantic processing skills independent of verbal abilities. Furthermore, in order to assess a patient’s potential for using alternative means of communication in cases of severe aphasia, semantic processing should be assessed in different nonverbal conditions. The Nonverbal Semantics Test (NVST) is a tool that captures semantic processing capacities through three tasks—Semantic Sorting, Drawing, and Pantomime. The main aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between the NVST and measures of standard neurolinguistic assessment. Fifty-one persons with aphasia caused by left hemisphere brain damage were administered the NVST as well as the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT). A principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted across all AAT and NVST subtests. The analysis resulted in a two-factor model that captured 69% of the variance of the original data, with all linguistic tasks loading high on one factor and the NVST subtests loading high on the other. These findings suggest that nonverbal tasks assessing semantic processing capacities should be administered alongside standard neurolinguistic aphasia tests. View Full-Text
Keywords: assessment tool; semantic processing; aphasia; semantic sorting; pantomime; drawing assessment tool; semantic processing; aphasia; semantic sorting; pantomime; drawing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hogrefe, K.; Goldenberg, G.; Glindemann, R.; Klonowski, M.; Ziegler, W. Nonverbal Semantics Test (NVST)—A Novel Diagnostic Tool to Assess Semantic Processing Deficits: Application to Persons with Aphasia after Cerebrovascular Accident. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 359. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030359

AMA Style

Hogrefe K, Goldenberg G, Glindemann R, Klonowski M, Ziegler W. Nonverbal Semantics Test (NVST)—A Novel Diagnostic Tool to Assess Semantic Processing Deficits: Application to Persons with Aphasia after Cerebrovascular Accident. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(3):359. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030359

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hogrefe, Katharina, Georg Goldenberg, Ralf Glindemann, Madleen Klonowski, and Wolfram Ziegler. 2021. "Nonverbal Semantics Test (NVST)—A Novel Diagnostic Tool to Assess Semantic Processing Deficits: Application to Persons with Aphasia after Cerebrovascular Accident" Brain Sciences 11, no. 3: 359. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030359

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