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Open AccessArticle

The Influence of Diabetes on Multisensory Integration and Mobility in Aging

1
Department of Neurology, Division of Cognitive & Motor Aging, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10467, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Jean-Jacques Temprado and Frank Suhr
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(3), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030285
Received: 21 December 2020 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 20 February 2021 / Published: 25 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aging in the Complex Brain-Muscular-Behavioral System)
(1) Background: one out of every four adults over the age of 65 are living with diabetes, and this alarming rate continues to increase with age. Diabetes in older adults is associated with many adverse health outcomes, including sensory and motor impairments. The objective of this exploratory study was to determine whether diabetes influences the interplay between multisensory integration processes and mobility in aging. (2) Methods: in this cross-sectional observational study, we recruited 339 non-demented older adults (76.59 ± 6.21 years; 52% female, 18% with diabetes). Participants completed a simple reaction time test in response to visual, somatosensory, and combined visual-somatosensory stimulation. Magnitude of visual-somatosensory integration was computed and served as the independent variable. (3) Results: logistic regression revealed that presence of diabetes was inversely associated with the magnitude of visual-somatosensory integration (β = −3.21; p < 0.01). Further, mediation models revealed that presence of diabetes negatively influenced the relationship of visual–somatosensory integration magnitude with balance (95% CI −0.16, −0.01) and gait (95% CI −0.09, −0.01). Participants with diabetes and taking insulin (n = 14) failed to integrate sensory information entirely; (4) conclusions: taken together, results from this exploration provide compelling evidence to support the adverse effect of diabetes on both multisensory and motor functioning in older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: aging; multisensory integration; sensorimotor integration; mobility aging; multisensory integration; sensorimotor integration; mobility
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mahoney, J.R.; Verghese, J.; George, C. The Influence of Diabetes on Multisensory Integration and Mobility in Aging. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 285. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030285

AMA Style

Mahoney JR, Verghese J, George C. The Influence of Diabetes on Multisensory Integration and Mobility in Aging. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(3):285. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030285

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Verghese, Joe; George, Claudene. 2021. "The Influence of Diabetes on Multisensory Integration and Mobility in Aging" Brain Sci. 11, no. 3: 285. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11030285

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