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Article

Cortical Activity Linked to Clocking in Deaf Adults: fNIRS Insights with Static and Animated Stimuli Presentation

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Laboratoire Ergonomie et Sciences Cognitives pour les Transports (LESCOT), University Gustave Eiffel, IFSTTAR, F-69675 Lyon, France
2
Laboratoire d’Etude de l’Apprentissage et du Développement, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (LEAD-CNRS UMR 5022), University of Bourgogne Franche-Comté, F-21065 Dijon, France
3
Laboratoire Cognition, Langues, Langage, Ergonomie, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CLLE-CNRS UMR 5263), University of Toulouse, 31000 Toulouse, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria E. Rubio
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(2), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11020196
Received: 20 December 2020 / Revised: 28 January 2021 / Accepted: 2 February 2021 / Published: 5 February 2021
The question of the possible impact of deafness on temporal processing remains unanswered. Different findings, based on behavioral measures, show contradictory results. The goal of the present study is to analyze the brain activity underlying time estimation by using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) techniques, which allow examination of the frontal, central and occipital cortical areas. A total of 37 participants (19 deaf) were recruited. The experimental task involved processing a road scene to determine whether the driver had time to safely execute a driving task, such as overtaking. The road scenes were presented in animated format, or in sequences of 3 static images showing the beginning, mid-point, and end of a situation. The latter presentation required a clocking mechanism to estimate the time between the samples to evaluate vehicle speed. The results show greater frontal region activity in deaf people, which suggests that more cognitive effort is needed to process these scenes. The central region, which is involved in clocking according to several studies, is particularly activated by the static presentation in deaf people during the estimation of time lapses. Exploration of the occipital region yielded no conclusive results. Our results on the frontal and central regions encourage further study of the neural basis of time processing and its links with auditory capacity. View Full-Text
Keywords: clocking; deafness; animation; fNIRS; motion prediction; temporal skill; time estimation clocking; deafness; animation; fNIRS; motion prediction; temporal skill; time estimation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Laurent, S.; Paire-Ficout, L.; Boucheix, J.-M.; Argon, S.; Hidalgo-Muñoz, A.R. Cortical Activity Linked to Clocking in Deaf Adults: fNIRS Insights with Static and Animated Stimuli Presentation. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 196. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11020196

AMA Style

Laurent S, Paire-Ficout L, Boucheix J-M, Argon S, Hidalgo-Muñoz AR. Cortical Activity Linked to Clocking in Deaf Adults: fNIRS Insights with Static and Animated Stimuli Presentation. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(2):196. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11020196

Chicago/Turabian Style

Laurent, Sébastien, Laurence Paire-Ficout, Jean-Michel Boucheix, Stéphane Argon, and Antonio R. Hidalgo-Muñoz. 2021. "Cortical Activity Linked to Clocking in Deaf Adults: fNIRS Insights with Static and Animated Stimuli Presentation" Brain Sciences 11, no. 2: 196. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11020196

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