Next Article in Journal
Cognitive Functions in Patients after Carotid Artery Revascularization—A Narrative Review
Previous Article in Journal
The Potential Impact of Digital Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis in The Netherlands: An Early Health Technology Assessment of MS Sherpa
 
 
Article

Compensatory and Lifestyle-Based Brain Health Program for Subjective Cognitive Decline: Self-Implementation versus Coaching

1
Alix School of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA
2
Department of Psychiatry & Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA
3
Department of Community Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA
4
Research Services, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Notger G. Müller
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(10), 1306; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11101306
Received: 24 July 2021 / Revised: 23 September 2021 / Accepted: 24 September 2021 / Published: 30 September 2021
Although recent studies have explored the potential of multidomain brain health programs, there is a dearth of literature on operationalizing this research to create a clinical treatment program specifically for subjective cognitive decline (SCD). Patients seen by geriatricians in primary care and by behavioral neurology services at our institution presenting with SCD were recruited via a patient-appropriate flyer. After all participants had a 1-h brain health consultation with a neuropsychologist and were provided with program materials, they were randomized to attend a 10-week intervention designed to support program implementation (N = 10) or the control group of implementing the program on their own (N = 11). The program included (1) a calendar-based executive and memory support system for compensatory training and (2) training in healthy lifestyle. There were no significant differences between groups for any outcomes. Participants across both groups showed significant improvements with moderate effect sizes in compensatory strategy use, anxiety symptoms, and daily functioning, which were sustained through 6-month follow-up. They also increased physical activity by the end of the intervention period but did not sustain this through 6-month follow-up. Our pilot study demonstrates preliminary feasibility of a cognitive compensatory and lifestyle-based brain health program. Additional research is recommended to further develop two potentially scalable implementation strategies—coaching and self-implementation after brief consultation. View Full-Text
Keywords: subjective cognitive decline; brain health; compensatory training subjective cognitive decline; brain health; compensatory training
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Liou, H.; Stonnington, C.M.; Shah, A.A.; Buckner-Petty, S.A.; Locke, D.E.C. Compensatory and Lifestyle-Based Brain Health Program for Subjective Cognitive Decline: Self-Implementation versus Coaching. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 1306. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11101306

AMA Style

Liou H, Stonnington CM, Shah AA, Buckner-Petty SA, Locke DEC. Compensatory and Lifestyle-Based Brain Health Program for Subjective Cognitive Decline: Self-Implementation versus Coaching. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(10):1306. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11101306

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liou, Harris, Cynthia M. Stonnington, Amit A. Shah, Skye A. Buckner-Petty, and Dona E. C. Locke. 2021. "Compensatory and Lifestyle-Based Brain Health Program for Subjective Cognitive Decline: Self-Implementation versus Coaching" Brain Sciences 11, no. 10: 1306. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11101306

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop