Next Article in Journal
How Do Continuous High-Resolution Models of Patchy Seabed Habitats Enhance Classification Schemes?
Previous Article in Journal
New Feature Classes for Acoustic Habitat Mapping—A Multibeam Echosounder Point Cloud Analysis for Mapping Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV)
Article Menu
Issue 5 (May) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Insight into Heterogeneous Calcite Cementation of Turbidite Channel-Fills from UAV Photogrammetry

1
Department of Earth Science ‘Ardito Desio’, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
2
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2019, 9(5), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9050236
Received: 2 April 2019 / Revised: 9 May 2019 / Accepted: 13 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
  |  
PDF [11193 KB, uploaded 23 May 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Diagenesis is a key controlling factor on sandstone porosity and permeability. Understanding type, paragenetic sequence and spatial patterns of cements is thus important for assessing sandstone hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In this study Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry is used to evaluate the shape and spatial distribution of calcite concretions developed within the sand-prone fill of a turbidite channel. The studied channel-fill is entrenched into hemipelagic marlstones and include a lower conglomeratic sandstone loaded with marlstone rip-ups and an upper fill featuring a range of turbidite bed types, which, up-section and off the channel axis, are progressively finer grained and less amalgamated. Concretion shape analysis highlighted a continuum of equant to oblate shapes with flat-lying major axes and a cumulative volume fraction of ca. 22%. Equant to sub-equant concretions are ubiquitous and occur at different heights within beds, often developing around marlstone rip-ups. Conversely, elongated concretions are either strata-bound concretions or completely cemented beds which become volumetrically dominant up section and off the channel axis. The interparticle pore-space of concretions represents on average ca. 22% and is tightly filled by poikilotopic and blocky calcite cement precipitated near to maximum burial depth, whereas host sandstones lack calcite cements and show smectite clay cement and an average preserved porosity of ca. 15%. The oxygen and carbon isotopes of calcite cements point to the marlstone as the main source of carbonate ions, suggesting concretions developed during burial by either diffusion from rip-ups and mud caps or recrystallization of, matrix micrite. Results suggest that the process by which the carbonate-rich component was eroded from the substrate and trapped within the channel-fill is a key control on spatial distribution of calcite concretions, likely to reflect on spatial variability of reservoir properties. View Full-Text
Keywords: turbidite channel; sandstone channel-fill; diagenesis; calcite concretion; unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry; hydrocarbon reservoir properties turbidite channel; sandstone channel-fill; diagenesis; calcite concretion; unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry; hydrocarbon reservoir properties
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Marini, M.; Della Porta, G.; Felletti, F.; Grasso, B.M.; Franzini, M.; Casella, V. Insight into Heterogeneous Calcite Cementation of Turbidite Channel-Fills from UAV Photogrammetry. Geosciences 2019, 9, 236.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Geosciences EISSN 2076-3263 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top