Next Article in Journal
Spirit Confronts the Four-Headed Monster: Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s Mistik–Infused Flood-Rise in Duvalierist Haiti
Next Article in Special Issue
Black Egyptians and White Greeks?: Historical Speculation and Racecraft in the Video Game Assassin’s Creed: Origins
Previous Article in Journal
The Future of Extinction: William S. Burroughs’ The Western Lands
Previous Article in Special Issue
Speculating Ancestor(ie)s: The Cavernous Memory of White Innocence and Fluid Embodiments of Afrofuturist Memory-Work
Open AccessArticle

Playing at the Margins: Colonizing Fictions in New England Larp

Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
Humanities 2020, 9(4), 143; https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040143
Received: 19 September 2020 / Revised: 9 December 2020 / Accepted: 10 December 2020 / Published: 14 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Racecraft and Speculative Culture)
North American larping (live-action roleplaying) is a collaborative performance that encourages critical and creative engagement with cooperative, improvisational narratives. Nevertheless, larping often relies on problematic engagements with race and racial stereotypes. Like many gaming hobbies, larp uses the idea of a “playable race”. Unlike other gaming arenas, however, larping necessitates that players physically embody a character in order to participate in the collaborative narrative: larpers embody fictional races and engage in a complex form of “race play”. Within this context, non-Indigenous players frequently appropriate Indigenous cultural practices and mobilize racist stereotypes. This paper explores this phenomenon and its ramifications. Based on seven years of ethnographic fieldwork and community participation in New England larping communities, I examine how concepts of Indigenous identity manifest in New England larp. I explore both Indigenous and non-Indigenous perspectives in order to demonstrate (a) how fantastical play facilitates cultural appropriation and damaging “race play” and (b) how these spaces affect Indigenous players. I close with Indigenous perspectives on new possibilities for Indigenous larp projects and cultural reclamation. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous anthropology; live-action roleplaying; embodied play; indigenous futurities indigenous anthropology; live-action roleplaying; embodied play; indigenous futurities
MDPI and ACS Style

Eddy, Z.A. Playing at the Margins: Colonizing Fictions in New England Larp. Humanities 2020, 9, 143. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040143

AMA Style

Eddy ZA. Playing at the Margins: Colonizing Fictions in New England Larp. Humanities. 2020; 9(4):143. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040143

Chicago/Turabian Style

Eddy, Zoë A. 2020. "Playing at the Margins: Colonizing Fictions in New England Larp" Humanities 9, no. 4: 143. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040143

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop