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Unsettling Australia: Disturbing White Settler Homemaking in Peter Carey’s True History of the Kelly Gang

Department of English and American Studies, Universität Wien, Spitalgasse 2-4/Hof 8.3, 1090 Wien, Austria
Humanities 2020, 9(4), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040115
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 19 September 2020 / Accepted: 24 September 2020 / Published: 25 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disturbances of the Home/land in Anglophone Postcolonial Literatures)
Proceeding from Australia’s specific situation as a settler colony, this article discusses how the ambivalences and fissures of settler subjectivity shape processes of homemaking. Settler homemaking depends on the disturbance of Indigenous Australians’ homelands via dispossession, exclusion, and genocide, but it equally depends upon the creation of a white settler subject as innocent, entitled, and belonging to what has been called ‘white indigeneity’. The article traces this double disturbance in Peter Carey’s novel True History of the Kelly Gang (2000). Carey’s rewriting of the iconic Kelly legend uncovers the dangers of a possessive, male, white indigeneity based on effacement and exclusion. The novel’s critical staging of Ned Kelly’s construction of Australia as a home for a new class of ‘natives’ challenges an essentialist white Australianness and its narratives of embattled settlement, independence, mateship, and the Bush. The novel shows that the creation of this national character is based on the denial of Aboriginal ownership and agency. Ned’s narrative of Irish victimhood and his formation of a new sense of Australianness is therefore doomed to repeat the violence, discrimination, and exclusion of colonialism that he seems to decry. View Full-Text
Keywords: settler colonialism; homemaking; Australia; aboriginal dispossession; whiteness; Peter Carey settler colonialism; homemaking; Australia; aboriginal dispossession; whiteness; Peter Carey
MDPI and ACS Style

Heinz, S. Unsettling Australia: Disturbing White Settler Homemaking in Peter Carey’s True History of the Kelly Gang. Humanities 2020, 9, 115. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040115

AMA Style

Heinz S. Unsettling Australia: Disturbing White Settler Homemaking in Peter Carey’s True History of the Kelly Gang. Humanities. 2020; 9(4):115. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040115

Chicago/Turabian Style

Heinz, Sarah. 2020. "Unsettling Australia: Disturbing White Settler Homemaking in Peter Carey’s True History of the Kelly Gang" Humanities 9, no. 4: 115. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9040115

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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