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Article

Germany without Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry—A 15 Month Real World Experience

Kliniken Lankreis Heidenheim gGmbH, Academic Teaching Hospital of Ulm University, Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, Schlosshaustr. 100, 89522 Heidenheim, Germany
Academic Editor: Anna Arstein-Kerslake
Received: 28 December 2015 / Revised: 10 March 2016 / Accepted: 14 March 2016 / Published: 17 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Collection Disability Human Rights Law)
Coercive treatment with antipsychotic drugs was commonly used in German psychiatric institutions until it became a topic of substantial medical, legal and ethical controversy. In 2011 and 2012, several landmark decisions by Germany’s Constitutional Court and Federal Supreme Court challenged this practice in all but life-threatening emergencies. In March 2013, the new legal provisions governing coercive treatment took effect allowing coercive medication under stricter criteria. While mainstream psychiatry in Germany resumed the use of coercive medication, although less frequently than before 2012, there are examples where clinicians put an even greater emphasis on consensual treatment and did not return to coercive treatment. Data from a case study in a local mental health service suggest that the use of coercive medication could be made obsolete. View Full-Text
Keywords: coercive treatment; human rights; psychiatry; Germany; constitutional court; UN convention coercive treatment; human rights; psychiatry; Germany; constitutional court; UN convention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zinkler, M. Germany without Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry—A 15 Month Real World Experience. Laws 2016, 5, 15. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws5010015

AMA Style

Zinkler M. Germany without Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry—A 15 Month Real World Experience. Laws. 2016; 5(1):15. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws5010015

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zinkler, Martin. 2016. "Germany without Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry—A 15 Month Real World Experience" Laws 5, no. 1: 15. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws5010015

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