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Article

Building Information Modeling in Quebec’s Procurement for Public Infrastructure: A Case for Integrated Project Delivery

1
CIRCERB–CRMR, Université Laval, 2325 Rue de l’Université, Ville de Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Faculty of Law, Université Laval, 2325 Rue de l’Université, Ville de Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
3
Academic and Student Affairs, Université Laval, 2320 Rue des Bibliothèques, Ville de Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Laws 2021, 10(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020043
Received: 27 April 2021 / Revised: 19 May 2021 / Accepted: 20 May 2021 / Published: 1 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laws and Emerging Technologies)
The Province of Quebec is currently in the process of adopting building information modeling (BIM) for major infrastructure projects. However, legal and contractual concerns such as the tendering process, adjudication criteria, intellectual property and risk–reward sharing mechanisms hinder the implementation of an efficient BIM process. This paper addresses the following question: How do norms, whether legislative, regulatory or contractual, functionally or dysfunctionally affect the effective implementation of BIM in Quebec’s public infrastructure framework? This paper suggests that the use of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) should help mitigate legal barriers hindering BIM implementation, while preserving balance between fairness and encouraging collaboration. Quebec’s normative framework, which includes legislation, regulations, contracts and infra-regulatory rules, should be modified to standardize collaborative mechanisms, integrate two-stage negotiated processes such as rank-and-run or best and final offer and enable the assessment of tenderers’ objective qualities and more subjective qualities. Furthermore, a risk–reward sharing mechanism should be implemented through target costing, and upstream participation from a wide range of stakeholders should be encouraged. View Full-Text
Keywords: building information modeling; integrated project delivery; public procurement; collaboration; infrastructure contracts building information modeling; integrated project delivery; public procurement; collaboration; infrastructure contracts
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jobidon, G.; Lemieux, P.; Beauregard, R. Building Information Modeling in Quebec’s Procurement for Public Infrastructure: A Case for Integrated Project Delivery. Laws 2021, 10, 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020043

AMA Style

Jobidon G, Lemieux P, Beauregard R. Building Information Modeling in Quebec’s Procurement for Public Infrastructure: A Case for Integrated Project Delivery. Laws. 2021; 10(2):43. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jobidon, Gabriel, Pierre Lemieux, and Robert Beauregard. 2021. "Building Information Modeling in Quebec’s Procurement for Public Infrastructure: A Case for Integrated Project Delivery" Laws 10, no. 2: 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/laws10020043

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