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Open AccessArticle

The Myrmecofauna (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Hungary: Survey of Ant Species with an Annotated Synonymic Inventory

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MTA-ELTE-MTM Ecology Research Group, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/C, 1117 Budapest, Hungary
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Evolutionary Ecology Research Group, Centre for Ecological Research, Institute of Ecology and Botany, 2163 Vácrátót, Hungary
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Department of Ecology and Natural History Collection, University of Szeged, Szeged Boldogasszony sgt. 17., 6722 Szeged, Hungary
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Department of Ecology, University of Szeged, Közép fasor 52, 6726 Szeged, Hungary
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Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Wilcza 64, 00-679 Warsaw, Poland
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Department of Evolutionary Zoology and Human Biology, University of Debrecen, Egyetem tér 1, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
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Kiskunság National Park Directorate, Liszt F. u. 19, 6000 Kecskemét, Hungary
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Hungarian Department of Biology and Ecology, Babeş-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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Centre for Systems Biology, Biodiversity and Bioresources, Babeș-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2021, 12(1), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12010078
Received: 4 December 2020 / Revised: 6 January 2021 / Accepted: 13 January 2021 / Published: 16 January 2021
Abundance is a hallmark of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). They are exceedingly common in both natural and artificial environments and they constitute a conspicuous part of the terrestrial ecosystem; every 3 to 4 out of 10 kg of insects are given by ants. Due to their key role in natural habitats, they are at the basis of any nature conservation and pest management policy. Thus, the first step in developing adequate management strategies is to build a precise faunistic inventory. More than 16,000 valid ant species are registered worldwide, of which 126 are known to occur in Hungary. Thanks to the last decade’s efforts in the Hungarian myrmecological research, and because of the constantly changing taxonomy of several problematic ant genera, a new checklist of the Hungarian ants is presented here. A comparison of the Hungarian myrmecofauna to other European countries’ ant fauna is also provided in this paper. The current dataset is a result of ongoing work on inventorying the Hungarian ant fauna, therefore it is expected to change over time and will be updated once the ongoing taxonomic projects are completed.
Ants (Hymenoptera: Forimicidae) are exceedingly common in nature. They constitute a conspicuous part of the terrestrial animal biomass and are also considered common ecosystem engineers. Due to their key role in natural habitats, they are at the basis of any nature conservation policy. Thus, the first step in developing adequate conservation and management policies is to build a precise faunistic inventory. More than 16,000 valid ant species are registered worldwide, of which 126 are known to occur in Hungary. Thanks to the last decade’s efforts in the Hungarian myrmecological research, and because of the constantly changing taxonomy of several problematic ant genera, a new checklist of the Hungarian ants is presented here. The state of the Hungarian myrmecofauna is also discussed in the context of other European countries’ ant fauna. Six species (Formica lemani, Lasius nitidigaster, Tetramorium immigrans, T. staerckei, T. indocile and Temnothorax turcicus) have been reported for the first time in the Hungarian literature, nine taxon names were changed after systematic replacements, nomenclatorial act, or as a result of splitting formerly considered continuous populations into more taxa. Two species formerly believed to occur in Hungary are now excluded from the updated list. All names are nomenclaturally assessed, and complete synonymies applied in the Hungarian literature for a certain taxon are provided. Wherever it is not self-evident, comments are added, especially to explain replacements of taxon names. Finally, we present a brief descriptive comparison of the Hungarian myrmecofauna with the ant fauna of the surrounding countries. The current dataset is a result of ongoing work on inventorying the Hungarian ant fauna, therefore it is expected to change over time and will be updated once the ongoing taxonomic projects are completed. View Full-Text
Keywords: ants; biogeography; faunistics; checklist; Europe ants; biogeography; faunistics; checklist; Europe
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MDPI and ACS Style

Csősz, S.; Báthori, F.; Gallé, L.; Lőrinczi, G.; Maák, I.; Tartally, A.; Kovács, É.; Somogyi, A.Á.; Markó, B. The Myrmecofauna (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Hungary: Survey of Ant Species with an Annotated Synonymic Inventory. Insects 2021, 12, 78. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12010078

AMA Style

Csősz S, Báthori F, Gallé L, Lőrinczi G, Maák I, Tartally A, Kovács É, Somogyi AÁ, Markó B. The Myrmecofauna (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Hungary: Survey of Ant Species with an Annotated Synonymic Inventory. Insects. 2021; 12(1):78. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12010078

Chicago/Turabian Style

Csősz, Sándor; Báthori, Ferenc; Gallé, László; Lőrinczi, Gábor; Maák, István; Tartally, András; Kovács, Éva; Somogyi, Anna Á.; Markó, Bálint. 2021. "The Myrmecofauna (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Hungary: Survey of Ant Species with an Annotated Synonymic Inventory" Insects 12, no. 1: 78. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects12010078

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