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Evaluation of NEON Data to Model Spatio-Temporal Tick Dynamics in Florida
Open AccessEditorial

Advancing the Science of Tick and Tick-Borne Disease Surveillance in the United States

1
Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, 110 Newins Ziegler Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2
Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3
Department of Geography, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(10), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100361
Received: 29 September 2019 / Accepted: 12 October 2019 / Published: 19 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tick Surveillance and Tick-borne Diseases)
Globally, vector-borne diseases are an increasing public health burden; in the United States, tick-borne diseases have tripled in the last three years. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recognizes the need for resilience to the increasing vector-borne disease burden and has called for increased partnerships and sustained networks to identify and respond to the most pressing challenges that face vector-borne disease management, including increased surveillance. To increase applied research, develop communities of practice, and enhance workforce development, the CDC has created five regional Centers of Excellence in Vector-borne Disease. These Centers are a partnership of public health agencies, vector control groups, academic institutions, and industries. This special issue on tick and tick-borne disease surveillance is a collection of research articles on multiple aspects of surveillance from authors that are affiliated with or funded by the CDC Centers of Excellence. This body of work illustrates a community-based system of research by which participants share common problems and use integrated methodologies to produce outputs and effect outcomes that benefit human, animal and environmental health. View Full-Text
Keywords: citizen science; National Ecological Observatory Network; One Health; species distribution modeling; state-space modeling; surveillance citizen science; National Ecological Observatory Network; One Health; species distribution modeling; state-space modeling; surveillance
MDPI and ACS Style

Wisely, S.M.; Glass, G.E. Advancing the Science of Tick and Tick-Borne Disease Surveillance in the United States. Insects 2019, 10, 361. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100361

AMA Style

Wisely SM, Glass GE. Advancing the Science of Tick and Tick-Borne Disease Surveillance in the United States. Insects. 2019; 10(10):361. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100361

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wisely, Samantha M.; Glass, Gregory E. 2019. "Advancing the Science of Tick and Tick-Borne Disease Surveillance in the United States" Insects 10, no. 10: 361. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100361

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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