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Article

Climate Change Impacts on Hydrological Processes in a South-Eastern European Catchment

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Fredericton Research and Development Centre, Environment and Climate Change Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 95 Innovation Rd., Fredericton, NB E3B 4Z7, Canada
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Canada Centre for Inland Waters, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington, ON L7S 1A1, Canada
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Research Center in Systems Ecology and Sustainability, University of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei, nr. 91-95, 050107 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Climatology, National Meteorological Administration, 97 Bucuresti-Ploiesti Rd., 013686 Bucharest, Romania
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Doctoral School of Geography, Faculty of Geography, Babeș-Bolyai University, 5-7 Clinicilor St., 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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Department of Hydrological Surface Water Studies, National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, 97 Bucureşti—Ploieşti Rd., 013686 Bucharest, Romania
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Athanasios Loukas
Water 2022, 14(15), 2325; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152325
Received: 2 June 2022 / Revised: 20 July 2022 / Accepted: 25 July 2022 / Published: 27 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Hydrology)
The output extracted from CNRM, MPR, and ICHEC Global Circulation Models for RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 Representative Concentration Pathways has been used in conjunction with the SWAT model for evaluating the impacts of future climate changes on hydrological processes in a Romanian catchment (Neajlov, 3720 km2 area) in the short (2021–2050) and long term (2071–2100). During the growing season, precipitation will decrease by up to 7.5% and temperature will increase by up to 4.2 °C by 2100. For the long term (2071–2100), the decrease in soil water content (i.e., 14% under RCP 4.5 and 21.5% under RCP 8.5) and streamflow (i.e., 4.2% under RCP 4.5 and 9.7% under RCP 8.5) during the growing season will accentuate the water stress in an already water-deficient area. The snow amount will be reduced under RCP 8.5 by more than 40% for the long term, consequently impacting the streamflow temporal dynamics. In addition, our results suggest that hydrological processes in the lower portions of the catchment are more sensitive to climate change. This study is the first Romanian catchment-scale study of this nature, and its findings support the development of tailored climate adaptation strategies at local and regional scales in Romania or elsewhere. View Full-Text
Keywords: catchment; climate change; hydrological modeling; LTSER; southeastern Europe; SWAT catchment; climate change; hydrological modeling; LTSER; southeastern Europe; SWAT
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MDPI and ACS Style

Danielescu, S.; Adamescu, M.C.; Cheval, S.; Dumitrescu, A.; Cazacu, C.; Borcan, M.; Postolache, C. Climate Change Impacts on Hydrological Processes in a South-Eastern European Catchment. Water 2022, 14, 2325. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152325

AMA Style

Danielescu S, Adamescu MC, Cheval S, Dumitrescu A, Cazacu C, Borcan M, Postolache C. Climate Change Impacts on Hydrological Processes in a South-Eastern European Catchment. Water. 2022; 14(15):2325. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152325

Chicago/Turabian Style

Danielescu, Serban, Mihai Cristian Adamescu, Sorin Cheval, Alexandru Dumitrescu, Constantin Cazacu, Mihaela Borcan, and Carmen Postolache. 2022. "Climate Change Impacts on Hydrological Processes in a South-Eastern European Catchment" Water 14, no. 15: 2325. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152325

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