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Article

A First Glimpse on Cold-Adapted PCB-Oxidizing Bacteria in Edmonson Point Lakes (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)

1
Institute of Polar Sciences, National Research Council of Italy (CNR-ISP), Spianata S. Raineri 86, 98122 Messina, Italy
2
Campus Scientifico, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Via Torino 155, 30170 Venice, Italy
3
Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, National Institute of Biology, Department BIOTECH, Villa Pace, Contrada Porticatello 29, 98167 Messina, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Abasiofiok Mark Ibekwe
Water 2022, 14(1), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010109
Received: 28 November 2021 / Revised: 23 December 2021 / Accepted: 1 January 2022 / Published: 5 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Life in the Cold: A Focus on Extreme Aquatic Environments)
Antarctic freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to human impacts. Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that have a long lifetime in the environment. Despite their use having either been phased out or restricted, they are still found in nature, also in remote areas. Once in the environment, the fate of PCBs is strictly linked to bacteria which represent the first step in the transfer of toxic compounds to higher trophic levels. Data on PCB-oxidizing bacteria from polar areas are still scarce and fragmented. In this study, the occurrence of PCB-oxidizing cold-adapted bacteria was evaluated in water and sediment of four coastal lakes at Edmonson Point (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica). After enrichment with biphenyl, 192 isolates were obtained with 57 of them that were able to grow in the presence of the PCB mixture Aroclor 1242, as the sole carbon source. The catabolic gene bphA, as a proxy for PCB degradation potential, was harbored by 37 isolates (out of 57), mainly affiliated to the genera Salinibacterium, Arthrobacter (among Actinobacteria) and Pusillimonas (among Betaproteobacteria). Obtained results enlarge our current knowledge on cold-adapted PCB-oxidizing bacteria and pose the basis for their potential application as a valuable eco-friendly tool for the recovery of PCB-contaminated cold sites. View Full-Text
Keywords: polychlorobiphenyls; cold-adapted bacteria; bphA gene; Antarctic coastal lakes polychlorobiphenyls; cold-adapted bacteria; bphA gene; Antarctic coastal lakes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Papale, M.; Lo Giudice, A.; Rappazzo, A.C.; Azzaro, M.; Rizzo, C. A First Glimpse on Cold-Adapted PCB-Oxidizing Bacteria in Edmonson Point Lakes (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica). Water 2022, 14, 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010109

AMA Style

Papale M, Lo Giudice A, Rappazzo AC, Azzaro M, Rizzo C. A First Glimpse on Cold-Adapted PCB-Oxidizing Bacteria in Edmonson Point Lakes (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica). Water. 2022; 14(1):109. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010109

Chicago/Turabian Style

Papale, Maria, Angelina Lo Giudice, Alessandro C. Rappazzo, Maurizio Azzaro, and Carmen Rizzo. 2022. "A First Glimpse on Cold-Adapted PCB-Oxidizing Bacteria in Edmonson Point Lakes (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)" Water 14, no. 1: 109. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010109

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