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Study on Heavy Metal Contamination in High Water Table Coal Mining Subsidence Ponds That Use Different Resource Reutilization Methods

by 1,2, 2, 2, 1 and 1,2,*
1
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China
2
Xuzhou Institute of Ecological Civilization Construction, Xuzhou 221008, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(12), 3348; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123348
Received: 27 October 2020 / Revised: 23 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 29 November 2020
Heavy metals accumulate in high water table coal mining subsidence ponds, resulting in heavy metal enrichment and destruction of the ecological environment. In this study, subsidence ponds with different resource reutilization methods were used as study subjects, and non-remediated subsidence ponds were collectively used as the control region to analyze the heavy metal distributions in water bodies, sediment, and vegetation. The results revealed the arsenic content in the water bodies slightly exceeded Class III of China’s Environmental Quality Standards for Surface Water. The lead content in water inlet vegetation of the control region and the Anguo wetland severely exceeded limits. Pearson’s correlation, PCA, and HCA analysis results indicated that the heavy metals at the study site could be divided into two categories: Category 1 is the most prevalent in aquaculture pond B and mainly originate from aquaculture. Category 2 predominates in control region D and mainly originates from atmospheric deposition, coal mining, and leaching. In general, the degree of heavy metal contamination in the Anguo wetland, aquaculture pond, and fishery–solar hybrid project regions is lower than that in the control region. Therefore, these models should be considered during resource reutilization of subsidence ponds based on the actual conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: coal mining subsidence pond; wetland; aquaculture pond; fishery–solar hybrid project region; heavy metals coal mining subsidence pond; wetland; aquaculture pond; fishery–solar hybrid project region; heavy metals
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tan, M.; Wang, K.; Xu, Z.; Li, H.; Qu, J. Study on Heavy Metal Contamination in High Water Table Coal Mining Subsidence Ponds That Use Different Resource Reutilization Methods. Water 2020, 12, 3348. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123348

AMA Style

Tan M, Wang K, Xu Z, Li H, Qu J. Study on Heavy Metal Contamination in High Water Table Coal Mining Subsidence Ponds That Use Different Resource Reutilization Methods. Water. 2020; 12(12):3348. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123348

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tan, Min; Wang, Kun; Xu, Zhou; Li, Hanghe; Qu, Junfeng. 2020. "Study on Heavy Metal Contamination in High Water Table Coal Mining Subsidence Ponds That Use Different Resource Reutilization Methods" Water 12, no. 12: 3348. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123348

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