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Open AccessReview

Strategies to Approach Stabilized Plasticity in Metals with Diminutive Volume: A Brief Review

1
Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
3
Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92607, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Helmut Cölfen and Ronald W. Armstrong
Crystals 2016, 6(8), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst6080092
Received: 29 April 2016 / Revised: 1 August 2016 / Accepted: 4 August 2016 / Published: 9 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crystal Dislocations)
Micrometer- or submicrometer-sized metallic pillars are widely studied by investigators worldwide, not only to provide insights into fundamental phenomena, but also to explore potential applications in microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices. While these materials with a diminutive volume exhibit unprecedented properties, e.g., strength values that approach the theoretical strength, their plastic flow is frequently intermittent as manifested by strain bursts, which is mainly attributed to dislocation activity at such length scales. Specifically, the increased ratio of free surface to volume promotes collective dislocation release resulting in dislocation starvation at the submicrometer scale or the formation of single-arm dislocation sources (truncated dislocations) at the micrometer scale. This article reviews and critically assesses recent progress in tailoring the microstructure of pillars, both extrinsically and intrinsically, to suppress plastic instabilities in micrometer or submicrometer-sized metallic pillars using an approach that involves confining the dislocations inside the pillars. Moreover, we identify strategies that can be implemented to fabricate submicrometer-sized metallic pillars that simultaneously exhibit stabilized plasticity and ultrahigh strength. View Full-Text
Keywords: plastic instability; strain bursts; nanopillars; softening; in situ TEM plastic instability; strain bursts; nanopillars; softening; in situ TEM
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hu, T.; Jiang, L.; Mukherjee, A.K.; Schoenung, J.M.; Lavernia, E.J. Strategies to Approach Stabilized Plasticity in Metals with Diminutive Volume: A Brief Review. Crystals 2016, 6, 92. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst6080092

AMA Style

Hu T, Jiang L, Mukherjee AK, Schoenung JM, Lavernia EJ. Strategies to Approach Stabilized Plasticity in Metals with Diminutive Volume: A Brief Review. Crystals. 2016; 6(8):92. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst6080092

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hu, Tao; Jiang, Lin; Mukherjee, Amiya K.; Schoenung, Julie M.; Lavernia, Enrique J. 2016. "Strategies to Approach Stabilized Plasticity in Metals with Diminutive Volume: A Brief Review" Crystals 6, no. 8: 92. https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst6080092

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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