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Article

Communication, Expectations, and Trust: An Experiment with Three Media

by 1,2,*,†,‡, 3,‡ and 3,‡
1
Centre for Geography, Resources, Environment, Energy and Networks, Bocconi University, 20136 Milan, Italy
2
Department of Food, Agricultural, and Resource Economics, Guelph University, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
3
Department of Economics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: via Roentgen 1, 20136 Milan, Italy.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Games 2020, 11(4), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/g11040048
Received: 1 August 2020 / Revised: 13 October 2020 / Accepted: 16 October 2020 / Published: 28 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Experiments on Communication in Games)
We studied how communication media affect trust game play. Three popular media were considered: traditional face-to-face, Facebook groups, and anonymous online chat. We considered post-communication changes in players’ expectations and preferences, and further analyzed the contents of group communications to understand the channels though which communication appears to improve trust and trustworthiness. For senders, the social, emotional, and game-relevant contents of communication all matter, significantly influencing both their expectations of fair return and preferences towards receivers. Receivers increased trustworthiness is mostly explained by their adherence to the norm of sending back a fair share of the amount received. These results do not qualitatively differ among the three communication media; while face-to-face had the largest volume of messages, all three media proved equally effective in enhancing trust and trustworthiness. View Full-Text
Keywords: communication technology; laboratory experiments; trust games; content analysis communication technology; laboratory experiments; trust games; content analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Abatayo, A.L.; Lynham, J.; Sherstyuk, K. Communication, Expectations, and Trust: An Experiment with Three Media. Games 2020, 11, 48. https://doi.org/10.3390/g11040048

AMA Style

Abatayo AL, Lynham J, Sherstyuk K. Communication, Expectations, and Trust: An Experiment with Three Media. Games. 2020; 11(4):48. https://doi.org/10.3390/g11040048

Chicago/Turabian Style

Abatayo, Anna L., John Lynham, and Katerina Sherstyuk. 2020. "Communication, Expectations, and Trust: An Experiment with Three Media" Games 11, no. 4: 48. https://doi.org/10.3390/g11040048

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