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Use of the Syrian Hamster as a New Model of Ebola Virus Disease and Other Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

1
Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Interagency Biodefense Campus, B-8200 Research Plaza, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA
2
Integrated Research Facility at Rocky Mountain Labs, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 903 South 4th Street, Hamilton, Montana 59840, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Viruses 2012, 4(12), 3754-3784; https://doi.org/10.3390/v4123754
Received: 14 November 2012 / Revised: 10 December 2012 / Accepted: 12 December 2012 / Published: 14 December 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Filovirus Research 2012)
Historically, mice and guinea pigs have been the rodent models of choice for therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasure testing against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Recently, hamsters have emerged as a novel animal model for the in vivo study of EVD. In this review, we discuss the history of the hamster as a research laboratory animal, as well as current benefits and challenges of this model. Availability of immunological reagents is addressed. Salient features of EVD in hamsters, including relevant pathology and coagulation parameters, are compared directly with the mouse, guinea pig and nonhuman primate models. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ebola; filovirus; hamster model; rodent model; pathogenesis Ebola; filovirus; hamster model; rodent model; pathogenesis
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Wahl-Jensen, V.; Bollinger, L.; Safronetz, D.; De Kok-Mercado, F.; Scott, D.P.; Ebihara, H. Use of the Syrian Hamster as a New Model of Ebola Virus Disease and Other Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Viruses 2012, 4, 3754-3784.

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