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Article

R-BPMV-Mediated Resistance to Bean pod mottle virus in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Is Heat-Stable but Elevated Temperatures Boost Viral Infection in Susceptible Genotypes

1
Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, INRAE, Univ Evry, Institute of Plant Sciences Paris-Saclay (IPS2), F-91405 Orsay, France
2
Université de Paris, CNRS, INRAE, Institute of Plant Sciences Paris-Saclay (IPS2), F-91405 Orsay, France
3
Seed and Plant Certification and Registration Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization, Ministry of Agriculture, Allameh Jafari Blvd, Karaj, Iran
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Eugene Savenkov and Katalin Nemes
Viruses 2021, 13(7), 1239; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13071239
Received: 8 May 2021 / Revised: 16 June 2021 / Accepted: 21 June 2021 / Published: 26 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Plant-Virus Interactions)
In the context of climate change, elevated temperature is a major concern due to the impact on plant–pathogen interactions. Although atmospheric temperature is predicted to increase in the next century, heat waves during summer seasons have already become a current problem. Elevated temperatures strongly influence plant–virus interactions, the most drastic effect being a breakdown of plant viral resistance conferred by some major resistance genes. In this work, we focused on the R-BPMV gene, a major resistance gene against Bean pod mottle virus in Phaseolus vulgaris. We inoculated different BPMV constructs in order to study the behavior of the R-BPMV-mediated resistance at normal (20 °C) and elevated temperatures (constant 25, 30, and 35 °C). Our results show that R-BPMV mediates a temperature-dependent phenotype of resistance from hypersensitive reaction at 20 °C to chlorotic lesions at 35 °C in the resistant genotype BAT93. BPMV is detected in inoculated leaves but not in systemic ones, suggesting that the resistance remains heat-stable up to 35 °C. R-BPMV segregates as an incompletely dominant gene in an F2 population. We also investigated the impact of elevated temperature on BPMV infection in susceptible genotypes, and our results reveal that elevated temperatures boost BPMV infection both locally and systemically in susceptible genotypes. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bean pod mottle virus; Phaseolus vulgaris L.; heat-stable resistance; high temperature Bean pod mottle virus; Phaseolus vulgaris L.; heat-stable resistance; high temperature
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meziadi, C.; Lintz, J.; Naderpour, M.; Gautier, C.; Blanchet, S.; Noly, A.; Gratias-Weill, A.; Geffroy, V.; Pflieger, S. R-BPMV-Mediated Resistance to Bean pod mottle virus in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Is Heat-Stable but Elevated Temperatures Boost Viral Infection in Susceptible Genotypes. Viruses 2021, 13, 1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13071239

AMA Style

Meziadi C, Lintz J, Naderpour M, Gautier C, Blanchet S, Noly A, Gratias-Weill A, Geffroy V, Pflieger S. R-BPMV-Mediated Resistance to Bean pod mottle virus in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Is Heat-Stable but Elevated Temperatures Boost Viral Infection in Susceptible Genotypes. Viruses. 2021; 13(7):1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13071239

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meziadi, Chouaïb, Julie Lintz, Masoud Naderpour, Charlotte Gautier, Sophie Blanchet, Alicia Noly, Ariane Gratias-Weill, Valérie Geffroy, and Stéphanie Pflieger. 2021. "R-BPMV-Mediated Resistance to Bean pod mottle virus in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Is Heat-Stable but Elevated Temperatures Boost Viral Infection in Susceptible Genotypes" Viruses 13, no. 7: 1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13071239

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