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Open AccessReview

Catching Chances: The Movement to Be on the Ground and Research Ready before an Outbreak

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2
Global Center for Health Security, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2018, 10(8), 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/v10080439
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 4 August 2018 / Accepted: 14 August 2018 / Published: 19 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Advances in Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus, and Cuevavirus Research)
After more than 28,000 Ebola virus disease cases and at least 11,000 deaths in West Africa during the 2014–2016 epidemic, the world remains without a licensed vaccine or therapeutic broadly available and demonstrated to alleviate suffering. This deficiency has been felt acutely in the two, short, following years with two Ebola virus outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and a Marburg virus outbreak in Uganda. Despite billions of U.S. dollars invested in developing medical countermeasures for filoviruses in the antecedent decades, resulting in an array of preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic products, none are available on commercial shelves. This paper explores why just-in-time research efforts in the field during the West Africa epidemic failed, as well as some recent initiatives to prevent similarly lost opportunities. View Full-Text
Keywords: filovirus; emergency clinical management research; medical countermeasures review; global health filovirus; emergency clinical management research; medical countermeasures review; global health
MDPI and ACS Style

Brett-Major, D.; Lawler, J. Catching Chances: The Movement to Be on the Ground and Research Ready before an Outbreak. Viruses 2018, 10, 439.

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