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Article

A Participatory Approach to Evaluating Strategies for Forest Carbon Mitigation in British Columbia

1
Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability, University of British Columbia, 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
2
School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, University of British Columbia, 6476 NW Marine Drive, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2, Canada
3
Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, 2900–2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2018, 9(4), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9040225
Received: 26 March 2018 / Revised: 18 April 2018 / Accepted: 19 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Participatory Forestry: Involvement, Information and Science)
To be successful, actions for mitigating climate change in the forest and forest sector will not only need to be informed by the best available science, but will also require strong public and/or political acceptability. This paper presents the results of a novel analytical-deliberative engagement process that brings together stakeholders and Indigenous Peoples in participatory workshops in the interior and coastal regions of British Columbia (BC) to evaluate a set of potential forest carbon mitigation alternatives. In particular, this study examines what objectives are prioritized by stakeholders and Indigenous Peoples when discussing forest carbon mitigation in BC’s forests, as well as the perceived effectiveness of, and levels of support for, six forest-based carbon mitigation strategies. We start by describing the methodological framework involving two series of workshops. We then describe the results from the first round of workshops where participants identified 11 objectives that can be classified into four categories: biophysical, economic, social, and procedural. Afterwards, we discuss the second series of workshops, which allowed participants to evaluate six climate change mitigation strategies against the objectives previously identified, and highlight geographical differences, if any, between BC’s coastal and interior regions. Our results effectively illustrate the potential and efficacy of our novel methodology in informing a variety of stakeholders in different regions, and generating consistent results with a surprising degree of consensus on both key objectives and preference for mitigation alternatives. We conclude with policy recommendations on how to consider various management objectives during the design and implementation of forest carbon mitigation strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change mitigation; forest management; forest carbon; preferences; deliberative-analytical process; British Columbia climate change mitigation; forest management; forest carbon; preferences; deliberative-analytical process; British Columbia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Peterson St-Laurent, G.; Hoberg, G.; Sheppard, S.R.J. A Participatory Approach to Evaluating Strategies for Forest Carbon Mitigation in British Columbia. Forests 2018, 9, 225. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9040225

AMA Style

Peterson St-Laurent G, Hoberg G, Sheppard SRJ. A Participatory Approach to Evaluating Strategies for Forest Carbon Mitigation in British Columbia. Forests. 2018; 9(4):225. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9040225

Chicago/Turabian Style

Peterson St-Laurent, Guillaume, George Hoberg, and Stephen R.J. Sheppard 2018. "A Participatory Approach to Evaluating Strategies for Forest Carbon Mitigation in British Columbia" Forests 9, no. 4: 225. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9040225

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