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Local People’s Participation in Mangrove Restoration Projects and Impacts on Social Capital and Livelihood: A Case Study in the Philippines

1
Department of Forest Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Graduate School of International Agricultural Technology, Institutes of Green Bio Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 1447 Pyeongchang-daero, Daehwa, Pyeongchang, Gangwon 25354, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(5), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050580
Received: 10 May 2020 / Revised: 15 May 2020 / Accepted: 17 May 2020 / Published: 22 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Economics and Human Dimensions)
Participatory forest management has been considered as a practical and effective strategy for sustainable forest management, especially in situations where land tenure is not securely settled. For effective forest restoration, local communities, as the cornerstone of participatory management, should be provided with incentives to facilitate their participation and active role. We postulate that participation in mangrove restoration projects can not only provide financial rewards but also yield intangible benefits for communities, i.e., social capital. The study was conducted in the province of Quezon, Philippines, using face-to-face interviews as the main method for data collection. Regression analyses were undertaken to assess the impact of local community participation in mangrove restoration projects on social capital and its potential benefits to people in terms of access to information and services, which are key components of livelihood. Results revealed that people’s participation in mangrove restoration projects contributes to increasing social capital, consequently improving their access to information and services. Local people’s participation is beneficial to communities, as it can improve their livelihoods. View Full-Text
Keywords: mangrove restoration; social capital; livelihood; participation; Philippines mangrove restoration; social capital; livelihood; participation; Philippines
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B. Valenzuela, R.; Yeo-Chang, Y.; Park, M.S.; Chun, J.-N. Local People’s Participation in Mangrove Restoration Projects and Impacts on Social Capital and Livelihood: A Case Study in the Philippines. Forests 2020, 11, 580.

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