Next Article in Journal
Understanding Tree Health under Increasing Climate and Trade Challenges: Social System Considerations
Previous Article in Journal
Spatial Distribution of Local Forest Products at the End of the 19th Century: A Case Study of Former Villages in Iwate Prefecture
 
 
Article

Root Exudation Rates Decrease with Increasing Latitude in Some Tree Species

1
Key Laboratory of Sustainable Forest Ecosystem Management-Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
2
College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Resource Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China
3
Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA
4
Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, 180 E. Green St., Athens, GA 30602, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(10), 1045; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101045
Received: 17 August 2020 / Revised: 15 September 2020 / Accepted: 27 September 2020 / Published: 28 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecophysiology and Biology)
Research Highlights: Understanding of the spatial variation of root exudation on a regional scale can help understand the response of plant physiological activities to environmental changes. Background and Objectives: Although root exudation has become an important topic in belowground ecology, its relationship with root traits and environmental factors is poorly understood. Our objective was to explore how root traits and environmental factors influence root exudation. Materials and Methods: We used a multi-factorial design consisting of three tree species spanning across sites located at three latitudes to assess root exudation dynamics, which was measured using a syringe-basis incubation system. Results: The strongest and clearest effect observed in our study was a decrease in root exudation rates of Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis Sieb. et Zucc.) and larch (Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Kuze.) at sites located in higher latitudes. Root exudation rates were positively related to mean annual temperature, mean annual precipitation, and negatively related to soil total organic carbon. Conclusions: Root exudation in coniferous species decreased at sites located in higher latitudes. Despite differences in root exudation rate among sites located at different latitudes and species with suitable variation in root morphological traits and environmental factors, we could not identify consistent influencing factors on root exudation rates. View Full-Text
Keywords: root exudates; fine-roots; root morphological traits; environmental factors; regional scale root exudates; fine-roots; root morphological traits; environmental factors; regional scale
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, L.; Wang, X.; Mao, Z.; Jiang, Z.; Gao, Y.; Chen, X.; Aubrey, D.P. Root Exudation Rates Decrease with Increasing Latitude in Some Tree Species. Forests 2020, 11, 1045. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101045

AMA Style

Yang L, Wang X, Mao Z, Jiang Z, Gao Y, Chen X, Aubrey DP. Root Exudation Rates Decrease with Increasing Latitude in Some Tree Species. Forests. 2020; 11(10):1045. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101045

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yang, Liu, Xiuwei Wang, Zijun Mao, Zhiyan Jiang, Yang Gao, Xiangwei Chen, and Doug P. Aubrey. 2020. "Root Exudation Rates Decrease with Increasing Latitude in Some Tree Species" Forests 11, no. 10: 1045. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11101045

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop