Next Article in Journal
Resource and Environmental Pressures on the Transformation of Planting Industry in Arid Oasis
Previous Article in Journal
A Redo Percutaneous Emergency Intervention of Left Ventricular Assist Device Graft Occlusion
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Collaborative Implementation Strategy to Increase Falls Prevention Training Using the Age-Friendly Health Systems Approach
Article

Communication Disparities between Nursing Home Team Members

1
Division of Geriatrics, Spencer Fox Eccles School of Medicine, University of Utah, 30 N 1900 E, AB 193 SOM, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA
2
Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC), George E. Wahlen Veteran Affairs Medical Center, 500 Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84148, USA
3
College of Nursing, University of Utah, 10 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
4
College of Pharmacy, University of Utah, 30 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nina Tumosa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5975; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105975
Received: 2 April 2022 / Revised: 10 May 2022 / Accepted: 12 May 2022 / Published: 14 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wellness and Health Promotion for the Older Adults)
Optimal care in nursing home (NH) settings requires effective team communication. Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) interact with nursing home residents frequently, but the extent to which CNAs feel their input is valued by other team members is not known. We conducted a cross-sectional study in which we administered a communication survey within 20 Utah nursing home facilities to 650 team members, including 124 nurses and 264 CNAs. Respondents used a 4-point scale to indicate the extent to which their input is valued by other team members when reporting their concerns about nursing home residents. We used a one-way ANOVA with a Bonferroni correction. When compared to nurses, CNAs felt less valued (CNA mean = 2.14, nurse mean = 3.24; p < 0.001) when reporting to physicians, and less valued (CNA mean = 1.66, nurse mean = 2.71; p < 0.001) when reporting to pharmacists. CNAs did not feel less valued than nurses (CNA mean = 3.43, nurse mean = 3.37; p = 0.25) when reporting to other nurses. Our findings demonstrate that CNAs feel their input is not valued outside of nursing, which could impact resident care. Additional research is needed to understand the reasons for this perception and to design educational interventions to improve the culture of communication in nursing home settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: long-term care; nursing home; nurse staffing; interprofessional communication; care coordination; teamwork long-term care; nursing home; nurse staffing; interprofessional communication; care coordination; teamwork
MDPI and ACS Style

Farrell, T.W.; Butler, J.M.; Towsley, G.L.; Telonidis, J.S.; Supiano, K.P.; Stephens, C.E.; Nelson, N.M.; May, A.L.; Edelman, L.S. Communication Disparities between Nursing Home Team Members. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5975. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105975

AMA Style

Farrell TW, Butler JM, Towsley GL, Telonidis JS, Supiano KP, Stephens CE, Nelson NM, May AL, Edelman LS. Communication Disparities between Nursing Home Team Members. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(10):5975. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105975

Chicago/Turabian Style

Farrell, Timothy W., Jorie M. Butler, Gail L. Towsley, Jacqueline S. Telonidis, Katherine P. Supiano, Caroline E. Stephens, Nancy M. Nelson, Alisyn L. May, and Linda S. Edelman. 2022. "Communication Disparities between Nursing Home Team Members" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 10: 5975. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105975

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop