Next Article in Journal
Spatial and Temporal Analysis of COVID-19 in the Elderly Living in Residential Care Homes in Portugal
Previous Article in Journal
Mental Health and Addiction Services Exclusive to LGBTQ2S+ during COVID-19: An Environmental Scan
 
 
Article

Do Budget Cigarettes Emit More Particles? An Aerosol Spectrometric Comparison of Particulate Matter Concentrations between Private-Label Cigarettes and More Expensive Brand-Name Cigarettes

Institute of Occupational Medicine, Social Medicine and Environmental Medicine, Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yuanchen Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5920; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105920
Received: 26 April 2022 / Revised: 10 May 2022 / Accepted: 11 May 2022 / Published: 13 May 2022
Private-label cigarettes are cigarettes that belong to the retailer itself. Private-label cigarettes from discounters or supermarkets are cheaper than brand-name cigarettes, and their lower price has allowed them to garner an ever-increasing share of the tobacco product market, especially among lower socioeconomic groups. Particulate matter (PM), a considerable component of air pollution, is a substantial health-damaging factor. Smoking is the primary source of PM in smokers’ homes. In a 2.88 m3 measuring chamber, the PM emission fractions PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 from three private-label cigarette brands and three brand-name cigarette brands with identical nicotine, tar, and carbon monoxide content were measured and compared to those of a reference cigarette by laser aerosol spectroscopy. All cigarette brands emitted PM in health-threatening quantities. The measurement results ranged from 1394 µg/m3 to 1686 µg/m3 PM10, 1392 µg/m3 to 1682 µg/m3 PM2.5, and 1355 µg/m3 to 1634 µg/m3 PM1, respectively. Only one private-label brand differed significantly (p < 0.001) from the other cigarette brands, which were tested with slightly lower PM levels. All other brands differed only marginally (not significant, p > 0.05) from one another. Significant (p < 0.05) negative correlations between private-label and brand-name cigarettes were found for PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 when accounting for tobacco filling densities, and for PM1 when accounting for filter lengths. The especially health-hazardous fraction PM1 accounted for the largest proportion of PM emissions from the cigarettes tested. The results of this study suggest that- cheaper tobacco products are as harmful as more expensive ones, at least regarding PM emissions. This highlights the importance of anti-smoking campaigns, especially for lower socioeconomic groups, where smoking is more widespread. Governments should reduce the price gap between cheap and more expensive tobacco products by implementing specific tobacco taxes. In such a case, at increasing prices of tobacco products, a downward shift to private-label cigarettes would probably decrease. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental tobacco smoke; passive smoke; private brands; store brands; smoking behavior; indoor air environmental tobacco smoke; passive smoke; private brands; store brands; smoking behavior; indoor air
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gerlach, G.; Braun, M.; Dröge, J.; Groneberg, D.A. Do Budget Cigarettes Emit More Particles? An Aerosol Spectrometric Comparison of Particulate Matter Concentrations between Private-Label Cigarettes and More Expensive Brand-Name Cigarettes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 5920. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105920

AMA Style

Gerlach G, Braun M, Dröge J, Groneberg DA. Do Budget Cigarettes Emit More Particles? An Aerosol Spectrometric Comparison of Particulate Matter Concentrations between Private-Label Cigarettes and More Expensive Brand-Name Cigarettes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(10):5920. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105920

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gerlach, Greta, Markus Braun, Janis Dröge, and David A. Groneberg. 2022. "Do Budget Cigarettes Emit More Particles? An Aerosol Spectrometric Comparison of Particulate Matter Concentrations between Private-Label Cigarettes and More Expensive Brand-Name Cigarettes" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 10: 5920. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105920

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop