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Open AccessArticle

Impact of COVID-19 on Healthcare Labor Market in the United States: Lower Paid Workers Experienced Higher Vulnerability and Slower Recovery

1
Department of Healthcare Administration and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89119, USA
2
Office of Research, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89102, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3894; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083894
Received: 27 February 2021 / Revised: 30 March 2021 / Accepted: 1 April 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
The resilience of the healthcare industry, often considered recession-proof, is being tested by the COVID-19 induced reductions in physical mobility and restrictions on elective and non-emergent medical procedures. We assess early COVID-19 effects on the dynamics of decline and recovery in healthcare labor markets in the United States. Descriptive analyses with monthly cross-sectional data on unemployment rates, employment, labor market entry/exit, and weekly work hours among healthcare workers in each healthcare industry and occupation, using the Current Population Survey from July 2019−2020 were performed. We found that unemployment rates increased dramatically for all healthcare industries, with the strongest early impacts on dentists’ offices (41.3%), outpatient centers (10.5%), physician offices (9.5%), and home health (7.8%). Lower paid workers such as technologists/technicians (10.5%) and healthcare aides (12.6%) were hit hardest and faced persistently high unemployment, while nurses (4%), physicians/surgeons (1.4%), and pharmacists (0.7%) were spared major disruptions. Unique economic vulnerabilities faced by low-income healthcare workers may need to be addressed to avoid serious disruptions from future events similar to COVID-19. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; healthcare employment; current population survey; labor market COVID-19; healthcare employment; current population survey; labor market
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bhandari, N.; Batra, K.; Upadhyay, S.; Cochran, C. Impact of COVID-19 on Healthcare Labor Market in the United States: Lower Paid Workers Experienced Higher Vulnerability and Slower Recovery. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083894

AMA Style

Bhandari N, Batra K, Upadhyay S, Cochran C. Impact of COVID-19 on Healthcare Labor Market in the United States: Lower Paid Workers Experienced Higher Vulnerability and Slower Recovery. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(8):3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083894

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bhandari, Neeraj; Batra, Kavita; Upadhyay, Soumya; Cochran, Christopher. 2021. "Impact of COVID-19 on Healthcare Labor Market in the United States: Lower Paid Workers Experienced Higher Vulnerability and Slower Recovery" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 8: 3894. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083894

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