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Article

The Role of Experience, Perceived Match Importance, and Anxiety on Cortisol Response in an Official Esports Competition

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Departamento de Fisiología Humana, Histiología, Anatomía Patológica, y Educación Física y Deportiva, Universidad de Málaga, 29010 Málaga, Spain
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Faculty of Sports Science, Universidad Europea de Madrid, 28670 Madrid, Spain
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Grupo de Investigación en Cultura, Educación y Sociedad, Universidad de la Costa, Barranquilla 080002, Colombia
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Departamento de Didáctica de la Educación Física y Salud, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja, 26002 Logroño, Spain
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Departamento de Didáctica y Organización Escolar, Universidad de Málaga, 29010 Málaga, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: José Carmelo Adsuar
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 2893; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062893
Received: 9 February 2021 / Revised: 28 February 2021 / Accepted: 10 March 2021 / Published: 12 March 2021
The aim of the present study was to analyse the neuroendocrine stress response, psychological anxiety response, and perceived match importance (PMI) between expert and non-expert control gamers in an official competitive context. We analyzed, in 25 expert esports players and 20 control participants, modifications in their somatic anxiety, cognitive anxiety, self-confidence, PMI, and cortisol in a League of Legends competition. We found how expert esports players presented higher cortisol concentrations (Z = 155.5; p = 0.03; Cohen’s d = −0.66), cognitive anxiety (Z = 99.5; p = 0.001), and PMI (Z = 50.5; p < 0.001) before the competition than non-experts participants. We found a greater statistical weight in the cognitive variables than in the physiological ones. The results obtained suggest that real competitive context and player’s expertise were factors associated with an anticipatory stress response. The PMI proved to be a differentiating variable between both groups, highlighting the necessity to include subjective variables that contrast objective measurements. View Full-Text
Keywords: esport; stress; competition; cortisol; anxiety esport; stress; competition; cortisol; anxiety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mendoza, G.; Clemente-Suárez, V.J.; Alvero-Cruz, J.R.; Rivilla, I.; García-Romero, J.; Fernández-Navas, M.; Albornoz-Gil, M.C.d.; Jiménez, M. The Role of Experience, Perceived Match Importance, and Anxiety on Cortisol Response in an Official Esports Competition. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2893. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062893

AMA Style

Mendoza G, Clemente-Suárez VJ, Alvero-Cruz JR, Rivilla I, García-Romero J, Fernández-Navas M, Albornoz-Gil MCd, Jiménez M. The Role of Experience, Perceived Match Importance, and Anxiety on Cortisol Response in an Official Esports Competition. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(6):2893. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062893

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mendoza, Guillermo, Vicente J. Clemente-Suárez, José R. Alvero-Cruz, Iván Rivilla, Jerónimo García-Romero, Manuel Fernández-Navas, Margarita C.d. Albornoz-Gil, and Manuel Jiménez. 2021. "The Role of Experience, Perceived Match Importance, and Anxiety on Cortisol Response in an Official Esports Competition" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 6: 2893. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18062893

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