Next Article in Journal
Monitoring Training and Recovery during a Period of Increased Intensity or Volume in Recreational Endurance Athletes
Previous Article in Journal
Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Microbiota: Which Impact on Lung Cancer?
Open AccessArticle

Skimmed Milk Applied as a Phytopharmaceutical Product: A Risk for Allergic Populations?

1
Center for Public Health and Primary Care Medicine (Unisanté), University of Lausanne, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Public Health Service, Vaud Canton, 1014 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: William A. Toscano
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2400; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052400
Received: 10 December 2020 / Revised: 29 January 2021 / Accepted: 24 February 2021 / Published: 1 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
Milk allergy is among the most common food-related allergies. Milk-based products are recognized as plant protection products (PPPs) in several countries as alternatives to synthetic pesticides. The potential health risk for allergic workers, as well as the general population, is yet to be assessed. An investigation was conducted in the Vaud Canton of Switzerland, where milk-based products are sprayed by helicopter over vineyards. Air lactose concentration was measured at 14 locations via 25 mm IOM Multidust samplers. Residual lactose concentration was measured on the surface of leaves over 7 days following spraying. Surface contamination downwind from the treated area was estimated through computer-based modeling using AgDRIFT® software. The average milk protein concentration inside and outside the vineyard was 0.47 and 0.16 µg/m3, respectively. Milk residues persisted on the leaf surface for an average of three days. Modelling results revealed an estimated order of magnitude of 0.1–0.5 µg/m3 in milk proteins within one hour after the treatment in the close vicinity of the treated area. Our results reveal that the potential exposure to milk proteins in and around helicopter-treated vineyards is not negligible and that prevention messages targeted to individuals with severe allergies should be considered. View Full-Text
Keywords: risk assessment; plant protection products; lactose; milk protein; milk allergy; treatment; air measurements; surface contamination; modelling risk assessment; plant protection products; lactose; milk protein; milk allergy; treatment; air measurements; surface contamination; modelling
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Graczyk, H.; Vernez, D.; Savic, N.; Milon, A.; Masserey, E. Skimmed Milk Applied as a Phytopharmaceutical Product: A Risk for Allergic Populations? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2400. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052400

AMA Style

Graczyk H, Vernez D, Savic N, Milon A, Masserey E. Skimmed Milk Applied as a Phytopharmaceutical Product: A Risk for Allergic Populations? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(5):2400. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052400

Chicago/Turabian Style

Graczyk, Halshka; Vernez, David; Savic, Nenad; Milon, Antoine; Masserey, Eric. 2021. "Skimmed Milk Applied as a Phytopharmaceutical Product: A Risk for Allergic Populations?" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 5: 2400. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052400

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop