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Article

Vinyl-Asbestos Floor Risk Exposure in Three Different Simulations

Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Turin, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Daniela Varrica
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2073; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042073
Received: 22 December 2020 / Revised: 28 January 2021 / Accepted: 9 February 2021 / Published: 20 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Paper in Environmental Chemistry and Technology)
Vinyl floors are widely used in public areas for their low cost and easy cleaning. From 1960 to 1980, asbestos was often added to improve vinyl floor performances. The Italian Ministerial Decree (M.D.) 06/09/94 indicates asbestos vinyl tiles as non-friable materials and, therefore, few dangerous to human health. This work aims to check through three different experimental tests if asbestos floor tiles, after decades of use, maintain their characteristics of compactness and non-friability. The effect of a small stone fragment stuck in the sole of rubber shoes was reproduced by striking the vinyl floor with a crampon. A vinyl tile was broken into smaller pieces with the aid of pliers to simulate what normally happens when workers replace the floors or sample it to verify the presence of asbestos. The third test reproduced the abrasion of the tile surface due to the dragging of furniture or heavy materials or sand grains that remain attached to the soles of shoes. The tests were carried out in safe conditions, working under an extractor hood with a glove box. Airborne sampling in the hood obtained the concentration of asbestos fibers produced in each test. The simulation tests performed confirms the possible release of fibers if the vinyl tiles are cut, abraded or perforated, as indicated by the Italian M.D. View Full-Text
Keywords: chrysotile asbestos; SEM analysis; vinyl-asbestos flooring; free asbestos fibers; simulation test chrysotile asbestos; SEM analysis; vinyl-asbestos flooring; free asbestos fibers; simulation test
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zichella, L.; Baudana, F.; Zanetti, G.; Marini, P. Vinyl-Asbestos Floor Risk Exposure in Three Different Simulations. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2073. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042073

AMA Style

Zichella L, Baudana F, Zanetti G, Marini P. Vinyl-Asbestos Floor Risk Exposure in Three Different Simulations. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):2073. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042073

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zichella, Lorena, Fiorenza Baudana, Giovanna Zanetti, and Paola Marini. 2021. "Vinyl-Asbestos Floor Risk Exposure in Three Different Simulations" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 2073. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042073

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