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Review

Relationships between Cognitive Functioning and Powered Mobility Device Use: A Scoping Review

1
Department of Rehabilitation, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Centre for Inter-Disciplinary Research in Rehabilitation and Social Integration (Cirris), Centre Intégré Universitaire de Santé et de Services Sociaux de la Capitale-Nationale (CIUSSS-CN), Quebec City, QC G1M 2S8, Canada
3
Department of Physical Therapy, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI 49401, USA
4
Université Laval-Bibliothèque, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
5
Université de Bordeaux—Handicap Activité Cognition Santé (EA 4136 HACS), 33076 Bordeaux, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12467; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312467
Received: 1 November 2021 / Revised: 23 November 2021 / Accepted: 23 November 2021 / Published: 26 November 2021
Background. Powered mobility devices (PMD) promote independence, social participation, and quality of life for individuals with mobility limitations. However, some individuals would benefit from PMD, but may be precluded access. This is particularly true for those with cognitive impairments who may be perceived as unsafe and unable to use a PMD. This study explored the relationships between cognitive functioning and PMD use. The objectives were to identify cognitive functions necessary to use a PMD and describe available PMD training approaches. Methods. A scoping review was undertaken. Results. Seventeen studies were included. Four examined the predictive or correlational relationships between cognitive functioning and PMD use outcomes with intellectual functions, visual and visuospatial perception, attention, abstraction, judgement, organization and planning, problem solving, and memory identified as having a relation with PMD use outcome in at least one study. Thirteen others studied the influence of PMD provision or training on users’ PMD capacity and cognitive outcomes and reported significative improvements of PMD capacities after PMD training. Six studies found improved cognitive scores after PMD training. Conclusions. Cognitive functioning is required to use a PMD. Individuals with heterogeneous cognitive impairment can improve their PMD capacities. Results contribute to advancing knowledge for PMD provision. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive functioning; power mobility devices; evaluations; training cognitive functioning; power mobility devices; evaluations; training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pellichero, A.; Kenyon, L.K.; Best, K.L.; Lamontagne, M.-E.; Lavoie, M.D.; Sorita, É.; Routhier, F. Relationships between Cognitive Functioning and Powered Mobility Device Use: A Scoping Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 12467. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312467

AMA Style

Pellichero A, Kenyon LK, Best KL, Lamontagne M-E, Lavoie MD, Sorita É, Routhier F. Relationships between Cognitive Functioning and Powered Mobility Device Use: A Scoping Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(23):12467. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312467

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pellichero, Alice, Lisa K. Kenyon, Krista L. Best, Marie-Eve Lamontagne, Marie D. Lavoie, Éric Sorita, and François Routhier. 2021. "Relationships between Cognitive Functioning and Powered Mobility Device Use: A Scoping Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 23: 12467. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312467

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