Next Article in Journal
Relationship between Willingness and Psychological Characteristics of Suicide Prevention Telephone Counselors: A Retrospective Observational Study
Previous Article in Journal
Correction: Shrader-Frechette, K.; Biondo, A.M. Health Misinformation about Toxic-Site Harm: The Case for Independent-Party Testing to Confirm Safety. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3882
Article

When Do Hedonic and Eudaimonic Orientations Lead to Happiness? Moderating Effects of Orientation Priority

by 1 and 2,*
1
Department of Psychology, School of Education, Zhejiang International Studies University, Hangzhou 310023, China
2
Mental Health Education Center, Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, Hangzhou 310018, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9798; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189798
Received: 31 July 2021 / Revised: 13 September 2021 / Accepted: 15 September 2021 / Published: 17 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Mental Health)
The effects of hedonic and eudaimonic orientations on individual well-being have received much scholarly attention. However, the empirical findings from previous research are not consistent, raising the question of when the pursuit of hedonia and eudaimonia lead to actual improvements in individual well-being. We argue that the relationship between orientations to happiness and well-being outcomes are moderated by orientation priorities, which reflect the relative level of importance individuals place on eudaimonic motives compared to hedonic motives. A total of 312 Chinese undergraduate students completed surveys assessing hedonic and eudaimonic orientations, orientation priorities, and well-being outcomes, including psychological well-being, positive affect, and negative affect. The results revealed that a eudaimonic orientation was positively related to psychological well-being, a hedonic orientation was positively related to positive affect, and both relationships were moderated by orientation priorities. For individuals who prioritized eudaimonia over hedonia, both orientations improved well-being. For individuals who prioritized hedonia over eudaimonia, the benefits related to well-being from both orientations decreased or disappeared. These findings suggest that orientation priorities are of equal importance in regard to hedonic and eudaimonic orientations. View Full-Text
Keywords: orientations to happiness; orientation priority; psychological well-being; positive affect; negative affect orientations to happiness; orientation priority; psychological well-being; positive affect; negative affect
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, H.; Zeng, Z. When Do Hedonic and Eudaimonic Orientations Lead to Happiness? Moderating Effects of Orientation Priority. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9798. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189798

AMA Style

Chen H, Zeng Z. When Do Hedonic and Eudaimonic Orientations Lead to Happiness? Moderating Effects of Orientation Priority. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(18):9798. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189798

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chen, Hezhi, and Zhijia Zeng. 2021. "When Do Hedonic and Eudaimonic Orientations Lead to Happiness? Moderating Effects of Orientation Priority" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 18: 9798. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189798

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop