Next Article in Journal
Analysis of Emotion and Recall in COVID-19 Advertisements: A Neuroscientific Study
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Surgical Volume in 2020 in Poland
Previous Article in Journal
The Psychological Restorative Effects of Campus Environments on College Students in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Case Study at Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Effect of Vaccination Rates on the Infection of COVID-19 under the Vaccination Rate below the Herd Immunity Threshold
Article

Factors Affecting Breastfeeding Practices under Lockdown during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Thailand: A Cross-Sectional Survey

Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Thomas Volken and Annina Zysset
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8729; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168729
Received: 3 August 2021 / Revised: 15 August 2021 / Accepted: 17 August 2021 / Published: 18 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 Pandemics: Impact on Health Care and Health Care Professions)
A COVID-19 lockdown and restrictive order has had a large impact on the lives of people. This cross-sectional study was conducted to identify factors affecting breastfeeding among mothers living in Thailand during the lockdown. Data were collected from 903 mothers with infants ages 0–12 months from 17 July 2020 to 17 October 2020 after the first nationwide COVID-19 lockdown period by an online platform and interview questionnaire survey. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between the effect of lockdown and breastfeeding practices with potential confounder adjustment including maternal age, ethnicity, newborn age <6 months, family income below $16,130 per annum, education below undergraduate level, and working status. Mothers changed breastfeeding practices in this period (n = 39, 4.32%) including having changed from exclusive breastfeeding to combined breastfeeding with formula milk (n = 22, 2.44%), and having reduced the frequency when compared to before the pandemic (n = 13, 1.44%). The associated factors of changing breastfeeding practices were “contact with healthcare services” (aOR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.96, p = 0.04), “infant feeding support from health personnel” (aOR = 0.39, 95% CI 0.16 to 1.94, p = 0.035), and “lack family support and help with feeding your baby after lockdown” (aOR = 7.04, 95% CI 1.92 to 25.84, p = 0.003). In conclusion, this study showed a slight decrease in breastfeeding in the sampled mothers during the COVID-19 lockdown in Thailand. A long-term national surveillance system for maintenance of breastfeeding should be established. Health care service interventions and additional information are needed to support mothers and families for breastfeeding during pandemics. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; lockdown; breastfeeding; infant feeding support; health care service contact; Thailand COVID-19; lockdown; breastfeeding; infant feeding support; health care service contact; Thailand
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Piankusol, C.; Sirikul, W.; Ongprasert, K.; Siviroj, P. Factors Affecting Breastfeeding Practices under Lockdown during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Thailand: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8729. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168729

AMA Style

Piankusol C, Sirikul W, Ongprasert K, Siviroj P. Factors Affecting Breastfeeding Practices under Lockdown during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Thailand: A Cross-Sectional Survey. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8729. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168729

Chicago/Turabian Style

Piankusol, Chanodom, Wachiranun Sirikul, Krongporn Ongprasert, and Penprapa Siviroj. 2021. "Factors Affecting Breastfeeding Practices under Lockdown during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Thailand: A Cross-Sectional Survey" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8729. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168729

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop