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Article

School-Based Prevention of Screen-Related Risk Behaviors during the Long-Term Distant Schooling Caused by COVID-19 Outbreak

1
Department of Addictology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, 12000 Prague, Czech Republic
2
Department of Addictology, General University Hospital in Prague, 12000 Prague, Czech Republic
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Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education, Charles University, 11000 Prague, Czech Republic
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Department of Cybernetics, Czech Technical University in Prague, 16627 Prague, Czech Republic
5
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 11638 Prague, Czech Republic
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Institute of Information Studies and Librarianship, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 11638 Prague, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Joanna Mazur
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168561
Received: 30 June 2021 / Revised: 10 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 13 August 2021
The COVID-19 outbreak and related restrictions meant a higher incidence of screen-related risk behaviors in both children and adolescents. Our goal was to assess the perceived importance and extent of school-based preventions related to these risks during the long-term, nation-wide distant schooling period in the Czech Republic. The online survey was responded to by the school-based prevention specialists (N = 1698). For the analysis, within-subject analysis of variance (ANOVA) and binominal logistic regression were used. At-risk internet use and cyber-bullying were perceived as pressing, but other risks, for example, excessive internet use or the use of cyberpornography, received substantially less priority. The differences in all grades were significant and moderate to large (η2G between 0.156 and 0.288). The proportion of schools which conducted prevention interventions of screen-related risks was low (between 0.7% and 27.8%, depending on the grade and the type of the risk). The probability of delivering prevention intervention was in all grades significantly predicted by the presence of screen-related problems in pupils (OR 3.76–4.88) and the perceived importance of the screen-related risks (OR 1.55–1.97). The limited capacity of schools to deliver prevention interventions during distant schooling as well as the low awareness and impaired ability to recognize the importance of some screen-related risks should be addressed. View Full-Text
Keywords: school-based prevention; adolescents; children; cross-sectional survey; excessive/problematic use of screens; internet; distant schooling school-based prevention; adolescents; children; cross-sectional survey; excessive/problematic use of screens; internet; distant schooling
MDPI and ACS Style

Lukavská, K.; Burda, V.; Lukavský, J.; Slussareff, M.; Gabrhelík, R. School-Based Prevention of Screen-Related Risk Behaviors during the Long-Term Distant Schooling Caused by COVID-19 Outbreak. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168561

AMA Style

Lukavská K, Burda V, Lukavský J, Slussareff M, Gabrhelík R. School-Based Prevention of Screen-Related Risk Behaviors during the Long-Term Distant Schooling Caused by COVID-19 Outbreak. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168561

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lukavská, Kateřina, Václav Burda, Jiří Lukavský, Michaela Slussareff, and Roman Gabrhelík. 2021. "School-Based Prevention of Screen-Related Risk Behaviors during the Long-Term Distant Schooling Caused by COVID-19 Outbreak" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8561. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168561

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