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Article

Oral Health Attitudes among Preclinical and Clinical Dental Students: A Pilot Study and Self-Assessment in an Egyptian State-Funded University

1
Clinic for Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, Christian-Albrecht’s University, 24105 Kiel, Germany
2
Fixed Prosthodontics Department, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566, Egypt
3
Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Klinikstrasse 33, 35392 Giessen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010234
Received: 13 November 2020 / Revised: 23 December 2020 / Accepted: 29 December 2020 / Published: 30 December 2020
Dentists should present to patients as good role models in their oral health behaviour. Previous studies have demonstrated how education can improve dental students’ oral health. This pilot investigation aimed to compare and evaluate the features of the oral health behaviour and attitudes of preclinical and clinical dental students at Ain Shams University, a public Egyptian university. The Hiroshima University-Dental Behaviour Inventory (HU-DBI) survey was provided to 149 (78 female/71 male) dental students. Dichotomised (agree/disagree) answers to 20 HU-DBI items were possible, with a maximum conceivable score of 19. An estimation of oral health behaviour and attitudes was calculated by the sum of correct oral health answers to every item by the study groups and evaluated statistically. The score of oral health-favouring answers was higher in clinical (11.50) than preclinical students (10.63) and was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Single-item evaluations showed no statistical significance, except in one survey item. This survey exhibited weak differences in the improvement of oral hygiene behaviour and attitudes between participating preclinical and clinical students, as well as overall poor oral health behaviour in both groups. This inadequacy of Egyptian public dental education in terms of sufficient student oral health progress emphasises the necessity for supplementary courses and curricular reviews that accentuate the need for future dentists to display the correct oral health behaviour. View Full-Text
Keywords: oral health attitudes; dental students; Germany; oral hygiene; Egypt; Ain Shams University; preclinical–clinical transition oral health attitudes; dental students; Germany; oral hygiene; Egypt; Ain Shams University; preclinical–clinical transition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mekhemar, M.; Ebeid, K.; Attia, S.; Dörfer, C.; Conrad, J. Oral Health Attitudes among Preclinical and Clinical Dental Students: A Pilot Study and Self-Assessment in an Egyptian State-Funded University. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 234. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010234

AMA Style

Mekhemar M, Ebeid K, Attia S, Dörfer C, Conrad J. Oral Health Attitudes among Preclinical and Clinical Dental Students: A Pilot Study and Self-Assessment in an Egyptian State-Funded University. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):234. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010234

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mekhemar, Mohamed, Kamal Ebeid, Sameh Attia, Christof Dörfer, and Jonas Conrad. 2021. "Oral Health Attitudes among Preclinical and Clinical Dental Students: A Pilot Study and Self-Assessment in an Egyptian State-Funded University" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 1: 234. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010234

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