Next Article in Journal
Understanding the Relationship between Situational Strength and Burnout: A Multi-Sample Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Comparison of Subjective Responses of Low Back Pain Patients and Asymptomatic Controls to Use of Spinal Exoskeleton during Simple Load Lifting Tasks: A Pilot Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Which Occupation is Highly Associated with Cognitive Impairment? A Gender-Specific Longitudinal Study of Paid and Unpaid Occupations in South Korea
Open AccessReview

Technology Used to Recognize Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

1
Department of Sport Science, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG11 8NS, UK
2
Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Derby, Derby DE22 1GB, UK
3
Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK
4
Department of Computing, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010163
Received: 28 October 2020 / Revised: 18 December 2020 / Accepted: 22 December 2020 / Published: 28 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing and Health: A Functional and Psychological Perspective)
The use of technology has been suggested as a means of allowing continued autonomous living for older adults, while reducing the burden on caregivers and aiding decision-making relating to healthcare. However, more clarity is needed relating to the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) recognised, and the types of technology included within current monitoring approaches. This review aims to identify these differences and highlight the current gaps in these systems. A scoping review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA-ScR, drawing on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Articles and commercially available systems were selected if they focused on ADL recognition of older adults within their home environment. Thirty-nine ADL recognition systems were identified, nine of which were commercially available. One system incorporated environmental and wearable technology, two used only wearable technology, and 34 used only environmental technologies. Overall, 14 ADL were identified but there was variation in the specific ADL recognised by each system. Although the use of technology to monitor ADL of older adults is becoming more prevalent, there is a large variation in the ADL recognised, how ADL are defined, and the types of technology used within monitoring systems. Key stakeholders, such as older adults and healthcare workers, should be consulted in future work to ensure that future developments are functional and useable. View Full-Text
Keywords: wearable technology; environmental sensors; autonomous living wearable technology; environmental sensors; autonomous living
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Camp, N.; Lewis, M.; Hunter, K.; Johnston, J.; Zecca, M.; Di Nuovo, A.; Magistro, D. Technology Used to Recognize Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling Older Adults. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 163. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010163

AMA Style

Camp N, Lewis M, Hunter K, Johnston J, Zecca M, Di Nuovo A, Magistro D. Technology Used to Recognize Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling Older Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(1):163. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010163

Chicago/Turabian Style

Camp, Nicola; Lewis, Martin; Hunter, Kirsty; Johnston, Julie; Zecca, Massimiliano; Di Nuovo, Alessandro; Magistro, Daniele. 2021. "Technology Used to Recognize Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling Older Adults" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 1: 163. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010163

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop