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Article

A Pilot Study of Airborne Hazards and Other Toxic Exposures in Iraq War Veterans

1
Emergency Medicine, SMG Norwood Hospital, Norwood (Greater Boston Area), MA 02062, USA
2
School of Nursing, Rhode Island College, Providence, RI 02908, USA
3
HunterSeven Foundation, Providence, RI 02906, USA
4
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, RI 02905, USA
5
Joint Trauma System, Defense Center of Excellence (CoE), Fort Sam Houston, Houston, TX 02905, USA
6
Emergency Medicine, Naval Medical Center San Diego (NMCSD), San Diego, CA 92134, USA
7
Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle (UoN), Newcastle 2308, Australia
8
Cooperative Studies Program Epidemiology Center, Health Services Research and Development, DVAHCS (Duke University Affiliate), Durham, NC 27705, USA
9
Department of Social Work, California State University, Stanislaus, Stanislaus, CA 95382, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3299; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093299
Received: 16 April 2020 / Accepted: 7 May 2020 / Published: 9 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The World in Crisis: Current Health Issues)
During their deployment to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), many Veterans were exposed to a wide array of toxic substances and psychologic stressors, most notably airborne/environmental pollutants from open burn pits. Service members do not deploy whilst unhealthy, but often they return with a multitude of acute and chronic symptoms, some of which only begin to manifest years after their deployment. Our findings, while preliminary in nature, suggest that Iraq War Veterans who participated in our survey reported a decrease in overall physical fitness and increased respiratory clinical symptoms compared with pre-deployment periods. The objective of this report is to provide information that will benefit how combat Veterans are cared for post-deployment. Strategies for a wider and more comprehensive assessment and medical screening process post-deployment are recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: burn pits; Iraq War; physical health; toxic exposures; Veterans burn pits; Iraq War; physical health; toxic exposures; Veterans
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MDPI and ACS Style

Poisson, C.; Boucher, S.; Selby, D.; Ross, S.P.; Jindal, C.; Efird, J.T.; Bith-Melander, P. A Pilot Study of Airborne Hazards and Other Toxic Exposures in Iraq War Veterans. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3299. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093299

AMA Style

Poisson C, Boucher S, Selby D, Ross SP, Jindal C, Efird JT, Bith-Melander P. A Pilot Study of Airborne Hazards and Other Toxic Exposures in Iraq War Veterans. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(9):3299. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093299

Chicago/Turabian Style

Poisson, Chelsey, Sheri Boucher, Domenique Selby, Sylvia P. Ross, Charulata Jindal, Jimmy T. Efird, and Pollie Bith-Melander. 2020. "A Pilot Study of Airborne Hazards and Other Toxic Exposures in Iraq War Veterans" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 9: 3299. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093299

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