Next Article in Journal
COVID-19 Surface Persistence: A Recent Data Summary and Its Importance for Medical and Dental Settings
Previous Article in Journal
Fluoroquinolone Metalloantibiotics: A Promising Approach against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Open AccessArticle

Symptom-Related Distress among Indigenous Australians in Specialist End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Multi-Jurisdictional Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration Data

1
Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
2
Eastern Health, Melbourne, VIC 3128, Australia
3
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia
4
Discipline of Emergency Medicine, Medical School, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
5
Rural Clinical School of Western Australia, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
6
School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
7
Telethon Kids Institute, Northern Entrance, Perth Children’s Hospital, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3131; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093131
Received: 6 April 2020 / Revised: 24 April 2020 / Accepted: 26 April 2020 / Published: 30 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Health Care Sciences & Services)
Symptom relief is fundamental to palliative care. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians are known to experience inequities in health care delivery and outcomes, but large-scale studies of end-of-life symptoms in this population are lacking. We compared symptom-related distress among Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian patients in specialist palliative care using the multi-jurisdictional Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration dataset. Based on patient-reported rating scale responses, adjusted relative risks (aRRs) stratified by care setting were calculated for occurrence of (i) symptom-related moderate-to-severe distress and worsening distress during a first episode of care and (ii) symptom-related moderate-to-severe distress at the final pre-death assessment. The p-value significance threshold was corrected for multiple comparisons. First-episode frequencies of symptom-related distress were similar among Indigenous (n = 1180) and non-Indigenous (n = 107,952) patients in both inpatient and community settings. In final pre-death assessments (681 Indigenous and 67,339 non-Indigenous patients), both groups had similar occurrence of moderate-to-severe distress when care was provided in hospital. In community settings, Indigenous compared with non-Indigenous patients had lower pre-death risks of moderate-to-severe distress from overall symptom occurrence (aRR 0.78; p = 0.001; confidence interval [CI] 0.67–0.91). These findings provide reassurance of reasonable equivalence of end-of-life outcomes for Indigenous patients who have been accepted for specialist palliative care. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aboriginal; palliative care; terminal care; symptom assessment; pain; psychological distress Aboriginal; palliative care; terminal care; symptom assessment; pain; psychological distress
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Woods, J.A.; Johnson, C.E.; Ngo, H.T.; Katzenellenbogen, J.M.; Murray, K.; Thompson, S.C. Symptom-Related Distress among Indigenous Australians in Specialist End-of-Life Care: Findings from the Multi-Jurisdictional Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration Data. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3131.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop