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Article

Workplace Violence and Its Effects on Burnout and Secondary Traumatic Stress among Mental Healthcare Nurses in Japan

Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kurume University School of Medicine, Asahi-machi 67, Kurume 830-0011, Japan
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2747; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082747
Received: 17 March 2020 / Revised: 13 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 April 2020 / Published: 16 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Society)
Workplace violence (WPV) in healthcare settings has drawn attention for over 20 years, yet few studies have investigated the association between WPV and psychological consequences. Here, we used a cross-sectional design to investigate (1) the 12-month prevalence of workplace violence (WPV), (2) the characteristics of WPV, and (3) the relationship between WPV and burnout/secondary traumatic stress among 599 mental healthcare nurses (including assistant nurses) from eight hospitals. Over 40% of the respondents had experienced WPV within the past 12 months. A multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that occupation and burnout were each significantly related to WPV. Secondary traumatic stress was not related to WPV. Our results suggest that WPV may be a long-lasting and/or cumulative stressor rather than a brief, extreme horror experience and may reflect specific characteristics of psychological effects in psychiatric wards. A longitudinal study measuring the severity and frequency of WPV, work- and non-work-related stressors, risk factors, and protective factors is needed, as is the development of a program that helps reduce the psychological burden of mental healthcare nurses due to WPV. View Full-Text
Keywords: workplace violence; mental healthcare nurses; secondary traumatic stress; burnout; nursing license workplace violence; mental healthcare nurses; secondary traumatic stress; burnout; nursing license
MDPI and ACS Style

Kobayashi, Y.; Oe, M.; Ishida, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Chiba, H.; Uchimura, N. Workplace Violence and Its Effects on Burnout and Secondary Traumatic Stress among Mental Healthcare Nurses in Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2747. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082747

AMA Style

Kobayashi Y, Oe M, Ishida T, Matsuoka M, Chiba H, Uchimura N. Workplace Violence and Its Effects on Burnout and Secondary Traumatic Stress among Mental Healthcare Nurses in Japan. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(8):2747. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082747

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kobayashi, Yudai; Oe, Misari; Ishida, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Michiko; Chiba, Hiromi; Uchimura, Naohisa. 2020. "Workplace Violence and Its Effects on Burnout and Secondary Traumatic Stress among Mental Healthcare Nurses in Japan" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 8: 2747. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082747

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