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Open AccessArticle

The Role of Leptin Levels in Adaptation to Cold Climates

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Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Yakut Science Centre of Complex Medical Problems, 677010 Yakutsk, Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia
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Laboratory of Molecular Biology, M.K. Ammosov North-Eastern Federal University, Yakutsk, 677000 Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia
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Laboratory of the Human in the Arctic, The Institute for Humanities Research and Indigenous Studies of the North, Federal Research Center “Yakut Science Center of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science”, Yakutsk, 677027 Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia
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Department of Pediatrics and Child Surgery, M.K. Ammosov North-Eastern Federal University, Yakutsk, 677000 Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia
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Laboratory of Monitoring Children Health and Medico-environmental Research, Yakut Science Centre of Complex Medical Problems, Yakutsk, 677010 Sakha Republic (Yakutia), Russia
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Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7003 Trondheim, Norway
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(6), 1854; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17061854
Received: 12 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 March 2020 / Published: 12 March 2020
Currently, adipose tissue is considered an endocrine organ that produces hormone-active substances, including leptin, which can play a key role in thermoregulation processes. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the influence of the climatic environment on leptin levels. A systematic literature search in the databases was carried out on 10 January 2020. Finally, 22 eligible articles were included in the current meta-analysis and a total of 13,320 participants were covered in the final analysis. It was shown that males of the “North” subgroup demonstrated significantly higher levels of leptin (10.02 ng/mL; CI: 7.92–12.13) than males of the “South” subgroup (4.9 ng/mL; CI: 3.71–6.25) (p = 0.0001). On the contrary, in the female group, a similar pattern was not detected (p = 0.91). Apparently, in order to maintain body temperature, higher leptin levels are required. The results of the study indicate that such effects are most pronounced in males and to a smaller extent in females, apparently due to a relatively high initial concentration of leptin in females. The correlation between leptin levels and climatic environment data support the hypothesis of leptin-mediated thermoregulation as an adaptive mechanism to cold climates. View Full-Text
Keywords: leptin; meta-analysis; thermoregulation; cold climates; adaptation leptin; meta-analysis; thermoregulation; cold climates; adaptation
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Nikanorova, A.A.; Barashkov, N.A.; Nakhodkin, S.S.; Pshennikova, V.G.; Solovyev, A.V.; Romanov, G.P.; Kuzmina, S.S.; Sazonov, N.N.; Burtseva, T.E.; Odland, J.Ø.; Fedorova, S.A. The Role of Leptin Levels in Adaptation to Cold Climates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1854.

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