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Article

Assessing the Potential Impact of a Long-Acting Skin Disinfectant in the Prevention of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission

Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1500; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051500
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 23 February 2020 / Published: 26 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Infectious Disease Epidemiology)
Healthcare-associated transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a persistent problem. The use of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) as a means of decolonizing patients, either through targeted decolonization or daily bathing, is frequently used to supplement other interventions. We explore the potential of a long-acting disinfectant with a persistent effect, immediate decolonizing action in the prevention of MRSA acquisition, and clinical illness and mortality in an 18-bed intensive care unit, based on a previous model. A scenario with no intervention is compared to CHG bathing, which decolonizes patients but provides no additional protection, and a hypothetical treatment that both decolonizes them and provides protection from subsequent colonization. The duration and effectiveness of this protection is varied to fully explore the potential utility of such a treatment. Increasing the effectiveness of the decolonizing agent reduces colonization, with a 10% increase resulting in a colonization rate ratio (RR) of 0.89 (95% CI: 0.89,0.90). Increasing the duration of protection results in a much more modest reduction, with a 12-hour increase in protection resulting in an RR of 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99, 0.99). There is little evidence of synergy between the two. View Full-Text
Keywords: MRSA; decolonization; hospital epidemiology MRSA; decolonization; hospital epidemiology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Short, C.T.; Mietchen, M.S.; Lofgren, E.T. Assessing the Potential Impact of a Long-Acting Skin Disinfectant in the Prevention of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 1500. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051500

AMA Style

Short CT, Mietchen MS, Lofgren ET. Assessing the Potential Impact of a Long-Acting Skin Disinfectant in the Prevention of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(5):1500. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051500

Chicago/Turabian Style

Short, Christopher T., Matthew S. Mietchen, and Eric T. Lofgren 2020. "Assessing the Potential Impact of a Long-Acting Skin Disinfectant in the Prevention of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 5: 1500. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051500

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